Rage attacks in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: Phenomenology and clinical correlates

Eric A. Storch, Anna M. Jones, Caleb W. Lack, Chelsea M. Ale, Michael L Sulkowski, Adam B. Lewin, Alessandro S. De Nadai, Tanya K. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Rage attacks have been documented in youth with varied psychiatric disorders, but few data have been reported on the clinical characteristics and correlates of rage attacks among children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Participants were 86 children (ages 6-16 years) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Patients and their primary caregiver were administered clinician-rated measures of obsessive-compulsive severity and rage severity. Children completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Child, whereas parents completed the Rage Attacks Questionnaire, Aberrant Behavior Checklist - Irritability Scale, Children's Affective Lability Scale, and Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Parent. Results: Rage was common among youth with OCD and was associated with varied clinical characteristics. Rage severity accounted for functional impairment beyond the influence of obsessive-compulsive symptom severity; however, these relations were explained by the impact of family accommodation. Conclusions: These data suggest that rage attacks are relatively common, have a negative impact on illness presentation, and contribute to functional impairment above and beyond obsessive-compulsive symptom severity. Rage may contribute to family accommodation of symptoms, which may further affect obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)582-592
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rage
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Pediatrics
Checklist
Caregivers
Psychiatry
Epidemiologic Studies
Parents
Depression

Keywords

  • anger attacks
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • rage
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Rage attacks in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder : Phenomenology and clinical correlates. / Storch, Eric A.; Jones, Anna M.; Lack, Caleb W.; Ale, Chelsea M.; Sulkowski, Michael L; Lewin, Adam B.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Murphy, Tanya K.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 51, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 582-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Storch, Eric A. ; Jones, Anna M. ; Lack, Caleb W. ; Ale, Chelsea M. ; Sulkowski, Michael L ; Lewin, Adam B. ; De Nadai, Alessandro S. ; Murphy, Tanya K. / Rage attacks in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder : Phenomenology and clinical correlates. In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2012 ; Vol. 51, No. 6. pp. 582-592.
@article{3e175b15873d490f88a0f0bf598d66d2,
title = "Rage attacks in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: Phenomenology and clinical correlates",
abstract = "Objective: Rage attacks have been documented in youth with varied psychiatric disorders, but few data have been reported on the clinical characteristics and correlates of rage attacks among children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Participants were 86 children (ages 6-16 years) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Patients and their primary caregiver were administered clinician-rated measures of obsessive-compulsive severity and rage severity. Children completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Child, whereas parents completed the Rage Attacks Questionnaire, Aberrant Behavior Checklist - Irritability Scale, Children's Affective Lability Scale, and Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Parent. Results: Rage was common among youth with OCD and was associated with varied clinical characteristics. Rage severity accounted for functional impairment beyond the influence of obsessive-compulsive symptom severity; however, these relations were explained by the impact of family accommodation. Conclusions: These data suggest that rage attacks are relatively common, have a negative impact on illness presentation, and contribute to functional impairment above and beyond obsessive-compulsive symptom severity. Rage may contribute to family accommodation of symptoms, which may further affect obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and impairment.",
keywords = "anger attacks, obsessive-compulsive disorder, rage, treatment",
author = "Storch, {Eric A.} and Jones, {Anna M.} and Lack, {Caleb W.} and Ale, {Chelsea M.} and Sulkowski, {Michael L} and Lewin, {Adam B.} and {De Nadai}, {Alessandro S.} and Murphy, {Tanya K.}",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaac.2012.02.016",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "51",
pages = "582--592",
journal = "Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry",
issn = "0890-8567",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rage attacks in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder

T2 - Phenomenology and clinical correlates

AU - Storch, Eric A.

AU - Jones, Anna M.

AU - Lack, Caleb W.

AU - Ale, Chelsea M.

AU - Sulkowski, Michael L

AU - Lewin, Adam B.

AU - De Nadai, Alessandro S.

AU - Murphy, Tanya K.

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - Objective: Rage attacks have been documented in youth with varied psychiatric disorders, but few data have been reported on the clinical characteristics and correlates of rage attacks among children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Participants were 86 children (ages 6-16 years) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Patients and their primary caregiver were administered clinician-rated measures of obsessive-compulsive severity and rage severity. Children completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Child, whereas parents completed the Rage Attacks Questionnaire, Aberrant Behavior Checklist - Irritability Scale, Children's Affective Lability Scale, and Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Parent. Results: Rage was common among youth with OCD and was associated with varied clinical characteristics. Rage severity accounted for functional impairment beyond the influence of obsessive-compulsive symptom severity; however, these relations were explained by the impact of family accommodation. Conclusions: These data suggest that rage attacks are relatively common, have a negative impact on illness presentation, and contribute to functional impairment above and beyond obsessive-compulsive symptom severity. Rage may contribute to family accommodation of symptoms, which may further affect obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and impairment.

AB - Objective: Rage attacks have been documented in youth with varied psychiatric disorders, but few data have been reported on the clinical characteristics and correlates of rage attacks among children with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Participants were 86 children (ages 6-16 years) with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Patients and their primary caregiver were administered clinician-rated measures of obsessive-compulsive severity and rage severity. Children completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Child, whereas parents completed the Rage Attacks Questionnaire, Aberrant Behavior Checklist - Irritability Scale, Children's Affective Lability Scale, and Child Sheehan Disability Scale-Parent. Results: Rage was common among youth with OCD and was associated with varied clinical characteristics. Rage severity accounted for functional impairment beyond the influence of obsessive-compulsive symptom severity; however, these relations were explained by the impact of family accommodation. Conclusions: These data suggest that rage attacks are relatively common, have a negative impact on illness presentation, and contribute to functional impairment above and beyond obsessive-compulsive symptom severity. Rage may contribute to family accommodation of symptoms, which may further affect obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and impairment.

KW - anger attacks

KW - obsessive-compulsive disorder

KW - rage

KW - treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861591432&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861591432&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaac.2012.02.016

DO - 10.1016/j.jaac.2012.02.016

M3 - Article

C2 - 22632618

AN - SCOPUS:84861591432

VL - 51

SP - 582

EP - 592

JO - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

SN - 0890-8567

IS - 6

ER -