Ranges of human mobility in Los Angeles and New York

Sibren Isaacman, Richard Becker, Ramon Caceres, Stephen Kobourov, Margaret Martonosi, James Rowland, Alexander Varshavsky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

The advent of ubiquitous, mobile, personal devices creates an unprecedented opportunity to improve our understanding of human movement. In this work, we study human mobility in Los Angeles and New York by analyzing anonymous records of approximate locations of cell phones belonging to residents of those cities. We examine two data sets gathered six months apart, each representing hundreds of thousands of people, containing hundreds of millions of location events, and spanning two months of activity. We present, compare, and validate the daily range of travel for people in these populations. Our findings include that human mobility changes with the seasons: both Angelenos and New Yorkers travel less in the winter, with New Yorkers showing a greater decrease in mobility during the cold months. We also show that text messaging activity does not by itself accurately characterize daily range, whereas voice calling alone suffices. Finally, we show that our methodology is accurate by comparing our results to ground truth obtained from volunteers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops, PERCOM Workshops 2011
Pages88-93
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2011
Event2011 9th IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops, PERCOM Workshops 2011 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Mar 21 2011Mar 25 2011

Publication series

Name2011 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops, PERCOM Workshops 2011

Other

Other2011 9th IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops, PERCOM Workshops 2011
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period3/21/113/25/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications

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