Rapid bursts of androgen-binding protein (Abp) gene duplication occurred independently in diverse mammals

Christina M Laukaitis, Andreas Heger, Tyler D. Blakley, Pavel Munclinger, Chris P. Ponting, Robert C. Karn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The draft mouse (Mus musculus) genome sequence revealed an unexpected proliferation of gene duplicates encoding a family of secretoglobin proteins including the androgen-binding protein (ABP) α, β and γ subunits. Further investigation of 14 α-like (Abpa) and 13 β- or γ-like (Abpbg) undisrupted gene sequences revealed a rich diversity of developmental stage-, sex- and tissue-specific expression. Despite these studies, our understanding of the evolution of this gene family remains incomplete. Questions arise from imperfections in the initial mouse genome assembly and a dearth of information about the gene family structure in other rodents and mammals. Results. Here, we interrogate the latest 'finished' mouse (Mus musculus) genome sequence assembly to show that the Abp gene repertoire is, in fact, twice as large as reported previously, with 30 Abpa and 34 Abpbg genes and pseudogenes. All of these have arisen since the last common ancestor with rat (Rattus norvegicus). We then demonstrate, by sequencing homologs from species within the Mus genus, that this burst of gene duplication occurred very recently, within the past seven million years. Finally, we survey Abp orthologs in genomes from across the mammalian clade and show that bursts of Abp gene duplications are not specific to the murid rodents; they also occurred recently in the lagomorph (rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus) and ruminant (cattle, Bos taurus) lineages, although not in other mammalian taxa. Conclusion. We conclude that Abp genes have undergone repeated bursts of gene duplication and adaptive sequence diversification driven by these genes' participation in chemosensation and/or sexual identification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number46
JournalBMC Evolutionary Biology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Androgen-Binding Protein
Gene Duplication
androgen
gene duplication
androgens
binding proteins
Mammals
mammal
mammals
protein
gene
Genes
genome assembly
Genome
genes
Mus musculus
genome
mice
rodents
Secretoglobins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Rapid bursts of androgen-binding protein (Abp) gene duplication occurred independently in diverse mammals. / Laukaitis, Christina M; Heger, Andreas; Blakley, Tyler D.; Munclinger, Pavel; Ponting, Chris P.; Karn, Robert C.

In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 8, No. 1, 46, 2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laukaitis, Christina M ; Heger, Andreas ; Blakley, Tyler D. ; Munclinger, Pavel ; Ponting, Chris P. ; Karn, Robert C. / Rapid bursts of androgen-binding protein (Abp) gene duplication occurred independently in diverse mammals. In: BMC Evolutionary Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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