Rapid eye movement density and latency and dexamethasone suppression as predictors of treatment response in depressed older adults

M. A. Corbishley, L. E. Beutler, S. Quan, C. Bamford, K. Meredith, F. Scogin, E. Blumberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The study investigated whether rapid eye movement (REM) latency and density, or the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) would predict the response of older adults to psychological (group cognitive behavior therapy) and biological (alprazolam) treatments for depression. The subjects were 56 adults (mean age, 70 years) with major depression. Depression measure were the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Beck Depression Inventory. Pretreatment assessment of sleep variables reflected normal (ie, nondepressed) values. Although 35% of subjects were DST nonsuppressors, the mean DST for the group was normal. Expected correlations among the biological variables and between these variables and baseline depression levels were not found. Depression in this group apparently was not characterized by biologic abnormalities, and sleep variables were not predictive of response to either treatment at any time point. However, low baseline DST levels were associated with good response to psychotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)846-859
Number of pages14
JournalCurrent Therapeutic Research - Clinical and Experimental
Volume47
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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