Rapid post-fire hydrologic watershed assessment using the AGWA GIS-based hydrologic modeling tool

D. C. Goodrich, H. Evan Canfield, I. Shea Burns, D. J. Semmens, S. N. Miller, M. Hernandez, L. R. Levick, D. P. Guertin, W. G. Kepner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rapid post-fire watershed assessment to identify potential trouble spots for erosion and flooding can potentially aid land managers and Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) teams in deploying mitigation and rehabilitation resources. These decisions are inherently complex and spatial in nature and require a distributed hydrological modeling approach. The extensive data requirements and the task of building input parameter files have presented obstacles to the timely and effective use of complex distributed rainfall-runoff and erosion models by BAER teams and resource managers. Geospatial tools and readily-available digital sources of pre-fire land cover, topography, and soils combined with rainfall-runoff and erosion models can expedite assessments if properly combined, provided a post-fire burn-severity map is available. The AGWA (Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment) hydrologic modeling tool was developed to utilize nationally available spatial data sets and both empirical (SWAT) and more process-based (KINEROS2) distributed hydrologic models (see: www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa). Through an intuitive interface the user selects an outlet from which AGWA delineates and discretizes the watershed using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The watershed model elements are then intersected with soils and land cover data layers to derive the requisite model input parameters. The chosen model is then run, and the results are imported back into AGWA for graphical display. AGWA can difference results from pre- and post-fire model simulations and display the change on the modeled watershed. This allows managers to identify potential problem areas where mitigation activities can be focused. An overview of AGWA and an application of it to the 2003 Aspen fire north of Tucson, Arizona are discussed herein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationManaging Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges - Proceedings of the 2005 Watershed Management Conference
EditorsG.E. Moglen
Pages509-520
Number of pages12
StatePublished - Nov 17 2005
Event2005 Watershed Management Conference - Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges - Williamsburg, VA, United States
Duration: Jul 19 2005Jul 22 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 2005 Watershed Management Conference - Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges

Other

Other2005 Watershed Management Conference - Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges
CountryUnited States
CityWilliamsburg, VA
Period7/19/057/22/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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    Goodrich, D. C., Evan Canfield, H., Shea Burns, I., Semmens, D. J., Miller, S. N., Hernandez, M., Levick, L. R., Guertin, D. P., & Kepner, W. G. (2005). Rapid post-fire hydrologic watershed assessment using the AGWA GIS-based hydrologic modeling tool. In G. E. Moglen (Ed.), Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges - Proceedings of the 2005 Watershed Management Conference (pp. 509-520). (Proceedings of the 2005 Watershed Management Conference - Managing Watersheds for Human and Natural Impacts: Engineering, Ecological, and Economic Challenges).