Rates and predictors of hepatitis C virus treatment in HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects

A. A. Butt, A. C. Justice, M. Skanderson, C. Good, Chian K Kwoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: True treatment rates and the impact of comorbidities on treatment rates for hepatitis C virus in the HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects are unknown. Aim: To quantify the rates of treatment prescription and the effect of comorbidities on hepatitis C virus treatment rates in HCV-HIV-coinfected veterans. Methods: The Veterans Affairs National Patient Care Database was used to identify all hepatitis C virus-infected subjects between 1999 and 2003 using ICD-9 codes. Demographics, comorbidities and pharmacy data were retrieved. We used logistic regression to compare the predictors of hepatitis C virus treatment in hepatitis C virus-monoinfected and HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects. Findings: We identified 120 507 hepatitis C virus-infected subjects, of which 6502 were HIV coinfected. 12% of the hepatitis C virus-monoinfected and 7% of the -coinfected subjects were prescribed hepatitis C virus treatment (P < 0.0001). Those not prescribed treatment were older (48.6 years vs. 47.7 years, P = 0.007) and more likely to be black (52% vs. 32%, P < 0.0001). HIV coinfected was less likely to be prescribed hepatitis C virus treatment (OR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.67-0.82). Among the coinfected subjects, the following were associated with non-treatment (OR, 95% CI): black race (0.45, 0.35-0.57); Hispanic race (0.56, 0.38-0.82); drug use (0.68, 0.53-0.88); anaemia (0.17, 0.11-0.26); bipolar disorder (0.63, 0.40-0.99); major depression (0.72, 0.53-0.99); mild depression (0.47, 0.35-0.62). Conclusions: A small number of HCV-HIV-coinfected veterans are prescribed treatment for hepatitis C virus. Non-treatment is associated with increasing age, minority race, drug use and psychiatric illness. Further studies are needed to determine the eligibility for treatment and reasons for non-treatment for hepatitis C virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)585-591
Number of pages7
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Hepacivirus
HIV
Veterans
Therapeutics
Comorbidity
International Classification of Diseases
Depression
Bipolar Disorder
Hispanic Americans
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Prescriptions
Psychiatry
Anemia
Patient Care
Logistic Models
Demography
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Rates and predictors of hepatitis C virus treatment in HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects. / Butt, A. A.; Justice, A. C.; Skanderson, M.; Good, C.; Kwoh, Chian K.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 24, No. 4, 08.2006, p. 585-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Butt, A. A. ; Justice, A. C. ; Skanderson, M. ; Good, C. ; Kwoh, Chian K. / Rates and predictors of hepatitis C virus treatment in HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects. In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2006 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 585-591.
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abstract = "Background: True treatment rates and the impact of comorbidities on treatment rates for hepatitis C virus in the HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects are unknown. Aim: To quantify the rates of treatment prescription and the effect of comorbidities on hepatitis C virus treatment rates in HCV-HIV-coinfected veterans. Methods: The Veterans Affairs National Patient Care Database was used to identify all hepatitis C virus-infected subjects between 1999 and 2003 using ICD-9 codes. Demographics, comorbidities and pharmacy data were retrieved. We used logistic regression to compare the predictors of hepatitis C virus treatment in hepatitis C virus-monoinfected and HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects. Findings: We identified 120 507 hepatitis C virus-infected subjects, of which 6502 were HIV coinfected. 12{\%} of the hepatitis C virus-monoinfected and 7{\%} of the -coinfected subjects were prescribed hepatitis C virus treatment (P < 0.0001). Those not prescribed treatment were older (48.6 years vs. 47.7 years, P = 0.007) and more likely to be black (52{\%} vs. 32{\%}, P < 0.0001). HIV coinfected was less likely to be prescribed hepatitis C virus treatment (OR 0.74, 95{\%} CI: 0.67-0.82). Among the coinfected subjects, the following were associated with non-treatment (OR, 95{\%} CI): black race (0.45, 0.35-0.57); Hispanic race (0.56, 0.38-0.82); drug use (0.68, 0.53-0.88); anaemia (0.17, 0.11-0.26); bipolar disorder (0.63, 0.40-0.99); major depression (0.72, 0.53-0.99); mild depression (0.47, 0.35-0.62). Conclusions: A small number of HCV-HIV-coinfected veterans are prescribed treatment for hepatitis C virus. Non-treatment is associated with increasing age, minority race, drug use and psychiatric illness. Further studies are needed to determine the eligibility for treatment and reasons for non-treatment for hepatitis C virus.",
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T1 - Rates and predictors of hepatitis C virus treatment in HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects

AU - Butt, A. A.

AU - Justice, A. C.

AU - Skanderson, M.

AU - Good, C.

AU - Kwoh, Chian K

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N2 - Background: True treatment rates and the impact of comorbidities on treatment rates for hepatitis C virus in the HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects are unknown. Aim: To quantify the rates of treatment prescription and the effect of comorbidities on hepatitis C virus treatment rates in HCV-HIV-coinfected veterans. Methods: The Veterans Affairs National Patient Care Database was used to identify all hepatitis C virus-infected subjects between 1999 and 2003 using ICD-9 codes. Demographics, comorbidities and pharmacy data were retrieved. We used logistic regression to compare the predictors of hepatitis C virus treatment in hepatitis C virus-monoinfected and HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects. Findings: We identified 120 507 hepatitis C virus-infected subjects, of which 6502 were HIV coinfected. 12% of the hepatitis C virus-monoinfected and 7% of the -coinfected subjects were prescribed hepatitis C virus treatment (P < 0.0001). Those not prescribed treatment were older (48.6 years vs. 47.7 years, P = 0.007) and more likely to be black (52% vs. 32%, P < 0.0001). HIV coinfected was less likely to be prescribed hepatitis C virus treatment (OR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.67-0.82). Among the coinfected subjects, the following were associated with non-treatment (OR, 95% CI): black race (0.45, 0.35-0.57); Hispanic race (0.56, 0.38-0.82); drug use (0.68, 0.53-0.88); anaemia (0.17, 0.11-0.26); bipolar disorder (0.63, 0.40-0.99); major depression (0.72, 0.53-0.99); mild depression (0.47, 0.35-0.62). Conclusions: A small number of HCV-HIV-coinfected veterans are prescribed treatment for hepatitis C virus. Non-treatment is associated with increasing age, minority race, drug use and psychiatric illness. Further studies are needed to determine the eligibility for treatment and reasons for non-treatment for hepatitis C virus.

AB - Background: True treatment rates and the impact of comorbidities on treatment rates for hepatitis C virus in the HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects are unknown. Aim: To quantify the rates of treatment prescription and the effect of comorbidities on hepatitis C virus treatment rates in HCV-HIV-coinfected veterans. Methods: The Veterans Affairs National Patient Care Database was used to identify all hepatitis C virus-infected subjects between 1999 and 2003 using ICD-9 codes. Demographics, comorbidities and pharmacy data were retrieved. We used logistic regression to compare the predictors of hepatitis C virus treatment in hepatitis C virus-monoinfected and HCV-HIV-coinfected subjects. Findings: We identified 120 507 hepatitis C virus-infected subjects, of which 6502 were HIV coinfected. 12% of the hepatitis C virus-monoinfected and 7% of the -coinfected subjects were prescribed hepatitis C virus treatment (P < 0.0001). Those not prescribed treatment were older (48.6 years vs. 47.7 years, P = 0.007) and more likely to be black (52% vs. 32%, P < 0.0001). HIV coinfected was less likely to be prescribed hepatitis C virus treatment (OR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.67-0.82). Among the coinfected subjects, the following were associated with non-treatment (OR, 95% CI): black race (0.45, 0.35-0.57); Hispanic race (0.56, 0.38-0.82); drug use (0.68, 0.53-0.88); anaemia (0.17, 0.11-0.26); bipolar disorder (0.63, 0.40-0.99); major depression (0.72, 0.53-0.99); mild depression (0.47, 0.35-0.62). Conclusions: A small number of HCV-HIV-coinfected veterans are prescribed treatment for hepatitis C virus. Non-treatment is associated with increasing age, minority race, drug use and psychiatric illness. Further studies are needed to determine the eligibility for treatment and reasons for non-treatment for hepatitis C virus.

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