Reaction of the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065 with DNA: Structure of a DNA adduct with DNA sequence specificity

Laurence Hurley, Vincent L. Reynolds, David H. Swenson, Gary L. Petzold, Terry A. Scahill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

264 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sequence-dependent variations in DNA revealed by x-ray crystallographic studies have suggested that certain DNA-reactive drugs may react preferentially with defined sequences in DNA. Drugs that wind around the helix and reside within one of the grooves of DNA have perhaps the greatest chance of recognizing sequence-dependent features of DNA. The antitumor antibiotic CC-1065 covalently binds through N-3 of adenine and resides within the minor groove of DNA. This drug overlaps with five base pairs for which a high sequence specificity exists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)843-844
Number of pages2
JournalScience
Volume226
Issue number4676
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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CC 1065
DNA Adducts
Anti-Bacterial Agents
DNA
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Adenine
Base Pairing
X-Rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Hurley, L., Reynolds, V. L., Swenson, D. H., Petzold, G. L., & Scahill, T. A. (1984). Reaction of the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065 with DNA: Structure of a DNA adduct with DNA sequence specificity. Science, 226(4676), 843-844.

Reaction of the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065 with DNA : Structure of a DNA adduct with DNA sequence specificity. / Hurley, Laurence; Reynolds, Vincent L.; Swenson, David H.; Petzold, Gary L.; Scahill, Terry A.

In: Science, Vol. 226, No. 4676, 1984, p. 843-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hurley, L, Reynolds, VL, Swenson, DH, Petzold, GL & Scahill, TA 1984, 'Reaction of the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065 with DNA: Structure of a DNA adduct with DNA sequence specificity', Science, vol. 226, no. 4676, pp. 843-844.
Hurley, Laurence ; Reynolds, Vincent L. ; Swenson, David H. ; Petzold, Gary L. ; Scahill, Terry A. / Reaction of the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065 with DNA : Structure of a DNA adduct with DNA sequence specificity. In: Science. 1984 ; Vol. 226, No. 4676. pp. 843-844.
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