Readiness to change physical activity and dietary practices and willingness to consult healthcare providers

Wendell C. Taylor, Joseph Hepworth, Emily Lees, Andrea Cassells, Yolene Gousse, M. Monica Sweeney, Anita Vaughn, Jonathan N. Tobin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Complementary or discrepant stages of change for multiple risk behaviors can guide the development of effective risk reduction interventions for multiple risk factors. The objectives of this study were to assess readiness to change physical activity and dietary practices and the relationships among readiness scores for physical activity and dietary practices. In an underserved population, the readiness scores were analyzed in relationship to the patient's interest in communicating with healthcare providers about health behavior change. Healthcare providers are important contributors in promoting behavior change in community health centers. Methods: Patients completed questionnaires about communicating with healthcare providers and readiness to change physical activity, intake of fruits and vegetables, dietary fat, calories and weight management. Frequency distributions, correlations, and analysis of variance were computed. Results: Readiness to change physical activity was not related to readiness to change dietary practices. Readiness to change fruit and vegetable intake and readiness to change dietary fat intake were significantly related. Readiness to change and interest in communicating with healthcare providers were significantly related for physical activity but not for dietary practices. Conclusions: Readiness to change behavior and interest in talking to healthcare providers were distinct dimensions; for physical activity, the dimensions were congruent and for dietary practices, the dimensions were unrelated. Readiness to change physical activity and dietary practices were not related (discrepant stages of readiness). Therefore, among underserved populations, sequential rather than simultaneous interventions may be appropriate when intervening on multiple risk behaviors, particularly physical activity and dietary practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2
JournalHealth Research Policy and Systems
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Health Personnel
Exercise
Dietary Fats
Vulnerable Populations
Risk-Taking
Vegetables
Fruit
Community Health Centers
Health Behavior
Risk Reduction Behavior
Analysis of Variance
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Readiness to change physical activity and dietary practices and willingness to consult healthcare providers. / Taylor, Wendell C.; Hepworth, Joseph; Lees, Emily; Cassells, Andrea; Gousse, Yolene; Sweeney, M. Monica; Vaughn, Anita; Tobin, Jonathan N.

In: Health Research Policy and Systems, Vol. 2, 2, 10.06.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, Wendell C. ; Hepworth, Joseph ; Lees, Emily ; Cassells, Andrea ; Gousse, Yolene ; Sweeney, M. Monica ; Vaughn, Anita ; Tobin, Jonathan N. / Readiness to change physical activity and dietary practices and willingness to consult healthcare providers. In: Health Research Policy and Systems. 2004 ; Vol. 2.
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