Real-time valve operation for water quality improvement in water distribution systems

Doo Sun Kang, Kevin E Lansey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to maintain water quality in water distribution systems, disinfection is performed by chemical addition. Chlorine, the most commonly used disinfectant, decays over time by reaction with organic materials in the water and produces potential harmful disinfection by- products (DBPs). Therefore, it is important to maintain the free chlorine residuals throughout the system within specified limits. Here, optimal valve operation has been combined with booster disinfection for water quality improvement. Valves are operated to alter the flow distribution in the network, prevent isolation of disinfectant and direct disinfectant laden-water to locations where it is required. A real-time optimal valve operation and booster disinfection problem is formulated as a single objective optimization approach. The objective is to minimize chlorine injection while maintaining chlorine concentrations and pressures at consumer nodes. The problem is solved using a single objective genetic algorithm. This paper presents the problem formulation methodology and its uniqueness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers
Pages614-620
Number of pages7
Volume342
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
EventWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers - Kansas City, MO, United States
Duration: May 17 2009May 21 2009

Other

OtherWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers
CountryUnited States
CityKansas City, MO
Period5/17/095/21/09

Fingerprint

disinfection
chlorine
genetic algorithm
water quality
water
methodology
water distribution system
water quality improvement
disinfectant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Kang, D. S., & Lansey, K. E. (2009). Real-time valve operation for water quality improvement in water distribution systems. In Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers (Vol. 342, pp. 614-620) https://doi.org/10.1061/41036(342)60

Real-time valve operation for water quality improvement in water distribution systems. / Kang, Doo Sun; Lansey, Kevin E.

Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers. Vol. 342 2009. p. 614-620.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kang, DS & Lansey, KE 2009, Real-time valve operation for water quality improvement in water distribution systems. in Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers. vol. 342, pp. 614-620, World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers, Kansas City, MO, United States, 5/17/09. https://doi.org/10.1061/41036(342)60
Kang DS, Lansey KE. Real-time valve operation for water quality improvement in water distribution systems. In Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers. Vol. 342. 2009. p. 614-620 https://doi.org/10.1061/41036(342)60
Kang, Doo Sun ; Lansey, Kevin E. / Real-time valve operation for water quality improvement in water distribution systems. Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers. Vol. 342 2009. pp. 614-620
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