Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional wall perturbations

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional perturbations at the wall is solved with the help of the biorthogonal eigenfunction system. The method allows computation of normal mode amplitudes of the discrete and continuous spectra. Considered examples of boundary layers over a flat plate include periodic-in-time blowing and suction through the wall at free-stream Mach numbers M = 2 and 4.5, and an array of roughness elements at M = 0.5 and 2. Results with the periodic-in-time actuator are compared with earlier results that were obtained by direct numerical integrations in the complex plane of the streamwise wavenumber. The main input into perturbation outside the boundary layer is associated with the fast acoustic waves. Perturbations associated with the entropy and vorticity modes have their maxima at the edge of the boundary layer, and they decay far from the edge (toward the Mach wave). In the case of roughness elements placed on the wall, there are counter-rotating streamwise vortices, a wake region downstream from the hump, and high-speed streaks at both sides of the hump. Temperature perturbation is positive in the wake region and negative on the sides. In the case of a cold wall, there is a low-temperature streak above the wake region that is attributed to displacement of the cold gas by the hump. In the supersonic boundary layer, in addition to the perturbations inside the boundary layer, the perturbations also have relatively large amplitudes in the vicinity of the Mach waves generated by the roughness elements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCollection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting
Pages13445-13463
Number of pages19
Volume18
StatePublished - 2006
Event44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting 2006 - Reno, NV, United States
Duration: Jan 9 2006Jan 12 2006

Other

Other44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting 2006
CountryUnited States
CityReno, NV
Period1/9/061/12/06

Fingerprint

compressible boundary layer
Boundary layers
boundary layer
perturbation
boundary layers
wakes
Mach number
roughness
Surface roughness
supersonic boundary layers
cold walls
cold gas
blowing
continuous spectra
free flow
suction
acoustic wave
flat plates
Blow molding
Vorticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Aerospace Engineering

Cite this

Tumin, A. (2006). Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional wall perturbations. In Collection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting (Vol. 18, pp. 13445-13463)

Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional wall perturbations. / Tumin, Anatoli.

Collection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. Vol. 18 2006. p. 13445-13463.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tumin, A 2006, Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional wall perturbations. in Collection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. vol. 18, pp. 13445-13463, 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting 2006, Reno, NV, United States, 1/9/06.
Tumin A. Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional wall perturbations. In Collection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. Vol. 18. 2006. p. 13445-13463
Tumin, Anatoli. / Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional wall perturbations. Collection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. Vol. 18 2006. pp. 13445-13463
@inproceedings{fd0aa5002d4d4163a208bb87298d59e1,
title = "Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional wall perturbations",
abstract = "Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional perturbations at the wall is solved with the help of the biorthogonal eigenfunction system. The method allows computation of normal mode amplitudes of the discrete and continuous spectra. Considered examples of boundary layers over a flat plate include periodic-in-time blowing and suction through the wall at free-stream Mach numbers M = 2 and 4.5, and an array of roughness elements at M = 0.5 and 2. Results with the periodic-in-time actuator are compared with earlier results that were obtained by direct numerical integrations in the complex plane of the streamwise wavenumber. The main input into perturbation outside the boundary layer is associated with the fast acoustic waves. Perturbations associated with the entropy and vorticity modes have their maxima at the edge of the boundary layer, and they decay far from the edge (toward the Mach wave). In the case of roughness elements placed on the wall, there are counter-rotating streamwise vortices, a wake region downstream from the hump, and high-speed streaks at both sides of the hump. Temperature perturbation is positive in the wake region and negative on the sides. In the case of a cold wall, there is a low-temperature streak above the wake region that is attributed to displacement of the cold gas by the hump. In the supersonic boundary layer, in addition to the perturbations inside the boundary layer, the perturbations also have relatively large amplitudes in the vicinity of the Mach waves generated by the roughness elements.",
author = "Anatoli Tumin",
year = "2006",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "1563478072",
volume = "18",
pages = "13445--13463",
booktitle = "Collection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional wall perturbations

AU - Tumin, Anatoli

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional perturbations at the wall is solved with the help of the biorthogonal eigenfunction system. The method allows computation of normal mode amplitudes of the discrete and continuous spectra. Considered examples of boundary layers over a flat plate include periodic-in-time blowing and suction through the wall at free-stream Mach numbers M = 2 and 4.5, and an array of roughness elements at M = 0.5 and 2. Results with the periodic-in-time actuator are compared with earlier results that were obtained by direct numerical integrations in the complex plane of the streamwise wavenumber. The main input into perturbation outside the boundary layer is associated with the fast acoustic waves. Perturbations associated with the entropy and vorticity modes have their maxima at the edge of the boundary layer, and they decay far from the edge (toward the Mach wave). In the case of roughness elements placed on the wall, there are counter-rotating streamwise vortices, a wake region downstream from the hump, and high-speed streaks at both sides of the hump. Temperature perturbation is positive in the wake region and negative on the sides. In the case of a cold wall, there is a low-temperature streak above the wake region that is attributed to displacement of the cold gas by the hump. In the supersonic boundary layer, in addition to the perturbations inside the boundary layer, the perturbations also have relatively large amplitudes in the vicinity of the Mach waves generated by the roughness elements.

AB - Receptivity of compressible boundary layers to three-dimensional perturbations at the wall is solved with the help of the biorthogonal eigenfunction system. The method allows computation of normal mode amplitudes of the discrete and continuous spectra. Considered examples of boundary layers over a flat plate include periodic-in-time blowing and suction through the wall at free-stream Mach numbers M = 2 and 4.5, and an array of roughness elements at M = 0.5 and 2. Results with the periodic-in-time actuator are compared with earlier results that were obtained by direct numerical integrations in the complex plane of the streamwise wavenumber. The main input into perturbation outside the boundary layer is associated with the fast acoustic waves. Perturbations associated with the entropy and vorticity modes have their maxima at the edge of the boundary layer, and they decay far from the edge (toward the Mach wave). In the case of roughness elements placed on the wall, there are counter-rotating streamwise vortices, a wake region downstream from the hump, and high-speed streaks at both sides of the hump. Temperature perturbation is positive in the wake region and negative on the sides. In the case of a cold wall, there is a low-temperature streak above the wake region that is attributed to displacement of the cold gas by the hump. In the supersonic boundary layer, in addition to the perturbations inside the boundary layer, the perturbations also have relatively large amplitudes in the vicinity of the Mach waves generated by the roughness elements.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34250880794&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34250880794&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:34250880794

SN - 1563478072

SN - 9781563478079

VL - 18

SP - 13445

EP - 13463

BT - Collection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting

ER -