Recognition and treatment of ethanol abuse in trauma patients

Brian L Erstad, D. G. Grier, M. E. Scott, M. J. Esser, P. Joshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate physicians' recognition of possible ethanol-related complications in trauma patients, and to compare benzodiazepine requirements in patients with positive and negative blood-ethanol concentrations. Design: Retrospective investigation. Setting: University medical center (level I trauma center). Patients: One hundred thirty-one trauma patients more than 18 years of age who were admitted for at least 24 hours. Outcome measures: (1) Physicians' recognition of ethanol (EtOH) as a potential factor complicating patient recovery in trauma patients admitted with positive blood-EtOH concentrations. (2) The amount of benzodiazepines administered to trauma patients with positive EtOH-blood concentrations compared to trauma patients with no detectable EtOH in their blood. Results: The presence of EtOH in the blood or the potential for EtOH withdrawal was mentioned in the progress notes of approximately one fourth of the patients with positive blood-EtOH concentrations. Thiamine was administered in 8.2% of patients with EtOH-related injuries. Benzodiazepine requirements were significantly higher in patients with positive versus negative blood-EtOH concentrations. Conclusions: Prompt recognition and charting of suspected ethanol abuse is recommended, in conjunction with prompt administration of thiamine. It should be anticipated that patients with positive blood-ethanol concentrations will require higher doses of benzodiazepines compared to trauma patients without ethanol-related injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-336
Number of pages7
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume25
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1996

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Ethanol
Wounds and Injuries
Benzodiazepines
Therapeutics
Thiamine
Physicians
Trauma Centers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Erstad, B. L., Grier, D. G., Scott, M. E., Esser, M. J., & Joshi, P. (1996). Recognition and treatment of ethanol abuse in trauma patients. Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, 25(4), 330-336.

Recognition and treatment of ethanol abuse in trauma patients. / Erstad, Brian L; Grier, D. G.; Scott, M. E.; Esser, M. J.; Joshi, P.

In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, Vol. 25, No. 4, 1996, p. 330-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erstad, BL, Grier, DG, Scott, ME, Esser, MJ & Joshi, P 1996, 'Recognition and treatment of ethanol abuse in trauma patients', Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 330-336.
Erstad, Brian L ; Grier, D. G. ; Scott, M. E. ; Esser, M. J. ; Joshi, P. / Recognition and treatment of ethanol abuse in trauma patients. In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care. 1996 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 330-336.
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