Recognition of vocal and facial cues to affect in language-impaired and normally-developing preschoolers

Marlena Creusere, Mary Alt, Elena M Plante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study was designed to investigate whether reported [J. Learn. Disabil. 31 (1998) 286; J. Psycholinguist. Res. 22 (1993) 445] difficulties in language-impaired children's ability to identify vocal and facial cues to emotion could be explained at least partially by nonparalinguistic factors. Children with specific language impairment (SLI) and control participants received an affect discrimination task, which consisted of the following cue situations: (1) facial expression and unfiltered speech; (2) lowpass-filtered speech only; (3) facial expression only; and (4) facial expression and filtered speech. The results of the study indicated that impaired and nonimpaired group performance differed only for the items including facial expression and nonfiltered speech. Developmental and investigative implications of this finding are addressed. Learning outcomes: As a result of this activity, the participant will be able to summarize the findings from existing research on affect comprehension in children with language impairments (LI). As a result of this activity, the participant will be able to discuss ways in which language impairment and difficulties in understanding emotion cues are associated and propose how these associations might influence social interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-20
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Communication Disorders
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Facial Expression
facial expression
Cues
Language
Child Language
language
Emotions
emotion
Aptitude
Interpersonal Relations
comprehension
discrimination
Learning
Recognition (Psychology)
Preschoolers
Language Impairment
ability
interaction
Research
learning

Keywords

  • Affect comprehension
  • Emotion cues
  • Specific language impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Recognition of vocal and facial cues to affect in language-impaired and normally-developing preschoolers. / Creusere, Marlena; Alt, Mary; Plante, Elena M.

In: Journal of Communication Disorders, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 5-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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