Recruitment of lysozyme as a major enzyme in the mouse gut: Duplication, divergence, and regulatory evolution

Michael F Hammer, James W. Schilling, Ellen M. Prager, Allan C. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two major types of lysozyme c (M and P) occur in the mouse genus, Mus, and have been purified from an inbred laboratory strain (C58/J) of M. domesticus. They differ in physical, catalytic, and antigenic properties as well as by amino acid replacements at 6 of 49 positions in the amino-terminal sequence. Comparisons with four other mammalian lysozymes c of known sequence suggest that M and P are related by a gene duplication that took place before the divergence of the rat and mouse lineages. M lysozyme is present in most tissues; achieves its highest concentration in the kidney, lung, and spleen; and corresponds to the lysozyme partially sequenced before from another strain of M. domesticus. In M. domesticus and several related species, P lysozyme was detected chiefly in the small intestine, where it is probably produced mainly by Paneth cells. A survey of M and P levels in 22 species of muroid rodents (from Mus and six other genera) of known phylogenetic relationships suggests that a mutation that derepressed the P enzyme arose about 4 million years ago in the ancestor of the housemouse group of species. Additional regulatory shifts affecting M and P levels have taken place along lineages leading to other muroid species. Our survey of 187 individuals of wild house mice and their closest allies reveals a correlation between latitude of origin and level of intestinal lysozyme.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272-279
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Molecular Evolution
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Muramidase
lysozyme
digestive system
divergence
enzyme
mice
Enzymes
enzymes
Mus
ancestry
Paneth Cells
rodent
mutation
Gene Duplication
amino acid
replacement
Mus musculus
gene duplication
phylogenetics
Small Intestine

Keywords

  • 22 Rodent species
  • Enzymatic properties
  • Latitudinal variation
  • Primary sequence
  • Tissue distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Recruitment of lysozyme as a major enzyme in the mouse gut : Duplication, divergence, and regulatory evolution. / Hammer, Michael F; Schilling, James W.; Prager, Ellen M.; Wilson, Allan C.

In: Journal of Molecular Evolution, Vol. 24, No. 3, 02.1987, p. 272-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hammer, Michael F ; Schilling, James W. ; Prager, Ellen M. ; Wilson, Allan C. / Recruitment of lysozyme as a major enzyme in the mouse gut : Duplication, divergence, and regulatory evolution. In: Journal of Molecular Evolution. 1987 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 272-279.
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