Redistribution in Aegean palatial societies: By appointment to his majesty the Wanax: Value-added goods and redistribution in Mycenaean palatial economies

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rather than treating redistribution as an undifferentiated economic function, scholars currently recognize that multiple forms may occur simultaneously. In this Forum Article, I focus on one such form in detail, specifically, the redistributive system that financed the production of prestige goods at the Palace of Nestor at Pylos. I employ the manufacture of chariots, perfumed oils, and textiles as case studies. The three industries had a number of features in common. They required raw materials that were dispersed. Their managers collected dispersed raw materials and allocated them to specialists, who added value to them through skilled labor and who produced composite artifacts that were then redistributed by palatial authorities to an exclusive group of recipients. While similarities in the management of the industries reflect an overall policy of resource mobilization through which palace authorities garnered the loyalty of an emergent class of secondary elites, the inconsistencies in the manner in which the industries were run also suggest that redistribution was not fully standardized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-227
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Archaeology
Volume115
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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redistribution
value added
raw materials
economy
industry
society
prestige
loyalty
mobilization
artifact
elite
recipient
manager
labor
management
resources
economics
Industry
Redistribution
Economy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Archaeology

Cite this

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