Rehabilitation after trauma; Does age matter?

Bellal A Joseph, Viraj Pandit, Hassan Aziz, Andrew - Tang, Narong Kulvatunyou, Julie Wynne, Chiu-Hsieh Hsu, Terence S Okeeffe, Lynn Gries, Randall S Friese, Peter M Rhee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Variability exits in the ability to predict overall recovery after trauma and inpatient rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify factors predicting functional improvement in trauma patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Methods: We performed a 3-y retrospective cohort analysis on a prospectively collected database of all trauma patients discharged from a level I trauma center to a single inpatient rehabilitation center. Patient's Functional Independence Measures (FIM) scores on hospital discharge and on discharge from the rehabilitation center were collected. Delta FIM was defined as the difference in FIM between rehabilitation center discharge and hospital discharge. Multiple linear regressions were performed to identify hospital admission factors associated with delta FIM. Results: We included 160 patients, 69% were male, mean age 54.6 ± 22 y, and median Injury Severity Score 14 [10-50]. Based on rehabilitation admission FIM scores, 29 were totally dependent and 131 were partially dependent. The mean change in FIM was 39.4 ± 13. Age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale on presentation, Injury Severity Score, systolic blood pressure on presentation, and intensive care unit length of stay were not predictive of delta FIM. Hospital length of stay and head Abbreviated Injury Score on hospital admission were negative predictors of delta FIM. Conclusions: In our study, age as an independent factor was not predictive of functional outcome after injury. The extent of head injury continues to negatively affect the overall functional improvement based on FIM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-545
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume184
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Rehabilitation Centers
Rehabilitation
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Injury Severity Score
Wounds and Injuries
Craniocerebral Trauma
Blood Pressure
Glasgow Coma Scale
Trauma Centers
Intensive Care Units
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Databases

Keywords

  • Age and rehabilitation
  • Functional improvement
  • Functional Independence Measure
  • Predicting outcomes after trauma
  • Rehabilitation after trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Rehabilitation after trauma; Does age matter? / Joseph, Bellal A; Pandit, Viraj; Aziz, Hassan; Tang, Andrew -; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Wynne, Julie; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Okeeffe, Terence S; Gries, Lynn; Friese, Randall S; Rhee, Peter M.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 184, No. 1, 2013, p. 541-545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Joseph, Bellal A ; Pandit, Viraj ; Aziz, Hassan ; Tang, Andrew - ; Kulvatunyou, Narong ; Wynne, Julie ; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh ; Okeeffe, Terence S ; Gries, Lynn ; Friese, Randall S ; Rhee, Peter M. / Rehabilitation after trauma; Does age matter?. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2013 ; Vol. 184, No. 1. pp. 541-545.
@article{2069ae588b8a412797b21eced3db9e09,
title = "Rehabilitation after trauma; Does age matter?",
abstract = "Background: Variability exits in the ability to predict overall recovery after trauma and inpatient rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify factors predicting functional improvement in trauma patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Methods: We performed a 3-y retrospective cohort analysis on a prospectively collected database of all trauma patients discharged from a level I trauma center to a single inpatient rehabilitation center. Patient's Functional Independence Measures (FIM) scores on hospital discharge and on discharge from the rehabilitation center were collected. Delta FIM was defined as the difference in FIM between rehabilitation center discharge and hospital discharge. Multiple linear regressions were performed to identify hospital admission factors associated with delta FIM. Results: We included 160 patients, 69{\%} were male, mean age 54.6 ± 22 y, and median Injury Severity Score 14 [10-50]. Based on rehabilitation admission FIM scores, 29 were totally dependent and 131 were partially dependent. The mean change in FIM was 39.4 ± 13. Age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale on presentation, Injury Severity Score, systolic blood pressure on presentation, and intensive care unit length of stay were not predictive of delta FIM. Hospital length of stay and head Abbreviated Injury Score on hospital admission were negative predictors of delta FIM. Conclusions: In our study, age as an independent factor was not predictive of functional outcome after injury. The extent of head injury continues to negatively affect the overall functional improvement based on FIM.",
keywords = "Age and rehabilitation, Functional improvement, Functional Independence Measure, Predicting outcomes after trauma, Rehabilitation after trauma",
author = "Joseph, {Bellal A} and Viraj Pandit and Hassan Aziz and Tang, {Andrew -} and Narong Kulvatunyou and Julie Wynne and Chiu-Hsieh Hsu and Okeeffe, {Terence S} and Lynn Gries and Friese, {Randall S} and Rhee, {Peter M}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1016/j.jss.2013.03.069",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "184",
pages = "541--545",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Research",
issn = "0022-4804",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rehabilitation after trauma; Does age matter?

AU - Joseph, Bellal A

AU - Pandit, Viraj

AU - Aziz, Hassan

AU - Tang, Andrew -

AU - Kulvatunyou, Narong

AU - Wynne, Julie

AU - Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh

AU - Okeeffe, Terence S

AU - Gries, Lynn

AU - Friese, Randall S

AU - Rhee, Peter M

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background: Variability exits in the ability to predict overall recovery after trauma and inpatient rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify factors predicting functional improvement in trauma patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Methods: We performed a 3-y retrospective cohort analysis on a prospectively collected database of all trauma patients discharged from a level I trauma center to a single inpatient rehabilitation center. Patient's Functional Independence Measures (FIM) scores on hospital discharge and on discharge from the rehabilitation center were collected. Delta FIM was defined as the difference in FIM between rehabilitation center discharge and hospital discharge. Multiple linear regressions were performed to identify hospital admission factors associated with delta FIM. Results: We included 160 patients, 69% were male, mean age 54.6 ± 22 y, and median Injury Severity Score 14 [10-50]. Based on rehabilitation admission FIM scores, 29 were totally dependent and 131 were partially dependent. The mean change in FIM was 39.4 ± 13. Age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale on presentation, Injury Severity Score, systolic blood pressure on presentation, and intensive care unit length of stay were not predictive of delta FIM. Hospital length of stay and head Abbreviated Injury Score on hospital admission were negative predictors of delta FIM. Conclusions: In our study, age as an independent factor was not predictive of functional outcome after injury. The extent of head injury continues to negatively affect the overall functional improvement based on FIM.

AB - Background: Variability exits in the ability to predict overall recovery after trauma and inpatient rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify factors predicting functional improvement in trauma patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. Methods: We performed a 3-y retrospective cohort analysis on a prospectively collected database of all trauma patients discharged from a level I trauma center to a single inpatient rehabilitation center. Patient's Functional Independence Measures (FIM) scores on hospital discharge and on discharge from the rehabilitation center were collected. Delta FIM was defined as the difference in FIM between rehabilitation center discharge and hospital discharge. Multiple linear regressions were performed to identify hospital admission factors associated with delta FIM. Results: We included 160 patients, 69% were male, mean age 54.6 ± 22 y, and median Injury Severity Score 14 [10-50]. Based on rehabilitation admission FIM scores, 29 were totally dependent and 131 were partially dependent. The mean change in FIM was 39.4 ± 13. Age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale on presentation, Injury Severity Score, systolic blood pressure on presentation, and intensive care unit length of stay were not predictive of delta FIM. Hospital length of stay and head Abbreviated Injury Score on hospital admission were negative predictors of delta FIM. Conclusions: In our study, age as an independent factor was not predictive of functional outcome after injury. The extent of head injury continues to negatively affect the overall functional improvement based on FIM.

KW - Age and rehabilitation

KW - Functional improvement

KW - Functional Independence Measure

KW - Predicting outcomes after trauma

KW - Rehabilitation after trauma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84884673708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84884673708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jss.2013.03.069

DO - 10.1016/j.jss.2013.03.069

M3 - Article

C2 - 23664534

AN - SCOPUS:84884673708

VL - 184

SP - 541

EP - 545

JO - Journal of Surgical Research

JF - Journal of Surgical Research

SN - 0022-4804

IS - 1

ER -