Relation of structural and vibratory kinematics of the vocal folds to two acoustic measures of breathy voice based on computational modeling

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To relate vocal fold structure and kinematics to 2 acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP) and the amplitude of the first harmonic relative to the second (H1-H2). Method: The authors used a computational, kinematic model of the medial surfaces of the vocal folds to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a manner consistent with breathy voice. Four model parameters were altered: degree of vocal fold adduction, surface bulging, vibratory nodal point, and supraglottal constriction. CPP and H1-H2 were measured from simulated glottal area, glottal flow, and acoustic waveforms and were related to the underlying vocal fold kinematics. Results: CPP decreased with increased separation of the vocal processes, whereas the nodal point location had little effect. H1-H2 increased as a function of separation of the vocal processes in the range of 1.0mmto 1.5mmand decreased with separation >1.5 mm. Conclusions: CPP is generally a function of vocal process separation. H1*-H2* (see paragraph 6 of article text for an explanation of the asterisks) will increase or decrease with vocal process separation on the basis of vocal fold shape, pivot point for the rotational mode, and supraglottal vocal tract shape, limiting its utility as an indicator of breathy voice. Future work will relate the perception of breathiness to vocal fold kinematics and acoustic measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1267-1283
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

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Vocal Cords
Biomechanical Phenomena
Acoustics
acoustics
Vibration
Fold
Kinematics
Computational Modeling
Constriction

Keywords

  • Acoustics
  • Breathy voice
  • Vocal folds
  • Voice simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Relation of structural and vibratory kinematics of the vocal folds to two acoustic measures of breathy voice based on computational modeling",
abstract = "Purpose: To relate vocal fold structure and kinematics to 2 acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP) and the amplitude of the first harmonic relative to the second (H1-H2). Method: The authors used a computational, kinematic model of the medial surfaces of the vocal folds to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a manner consistent with breathy voice. Four model parameters were altered: degree of vocal fold adduction, surface bulging, vibratory nodal point, and supraglottal constriction. CPP and H1-H2 were measured from simulated glottal area, glottal flow, and acoustic waveforms and were related to the underlying vocal fold kinematics. Results: CPP decreased with increased separation of the vocal processes, whereas the nodal point location had little effect. H1-H2 increased as a function of separation of the vocal processes in the range of 1.0mmto 1.5mmand decreased with separation >1.5 mm. Conclusions: CPP is generally a function of vocal process separation. H1*-H2* (see paragraph 6 of article text for an explanation of the asterisks) will increase or decrease with vocal process separation on the basis of vocal fold shape, pivot point for the rotational mode, and supraglottal vocal tract shape, limiting its utility as an indicator of breathy voice. Future work will relate the perception of breathiness to vocal fold kinematics and acoustic measures.",
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author = "Samlan, {Robin A} and Story, {Brad H}",
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N2 - Purpose: To relate vocal fold structure and kinematics to 2 acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP) and the amplitude of the first harmonic relative to the second (H1-H2). Method: The authors used a computational, kinematic model of the medial surfaces of the vocal folds to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a manner consistent with breathy voice. Four model parameters were altered: degree of vocal fold adduction, surface bulging, vibratory nodal point, and supraglottal constriction. CPP and H1-H2 were measured from simulated glottal area, glottal flow, and acoustic waveforms and were related to the underlying vocal fold kinematics. Results: CPP decreased with increased separation of the vocal processes, whereas the nodal point location had little effect. H1-H2 increased as a function of separation of the vocal processes in the range of 1.0mmto 1.5mmand decreased with separation >1.5 mm. Conclusions: CPP is generally a function of vocal process separation. H1*-H2* (see paragraph 6 of article text for an explanation of the asterisks) will increase or decrease with vocal process separation on the basis of vocal fold shape, pivot point for the rotational mode, and supraglottal vocal tract shape, limiting its utility as an indicator of breathy voice. Future work will relate the perception of breathiness to vocal fold kinematics and acoustic measures.

AB - Purpose: To relate vocal fold structure and kinematics to 2 acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP) and the amplitude of the first harmonic relative to the second (H1-H2). Method: The authors used a computational, kinematic model of the medial surfaces of the vocal folds to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a manner consistent with breathy voice. Four model parameters were altered: degree of vocal fold adduction, surface bulging, vibratory nodal point, and supraglottal constriction. CPP and H1-H2 were measured from simulated glottal area, glottal flow, and acoustic waveforms and were related to the underlying vocal fold kinematics. Results: CPP decreased with increased separation of the vocal processes, whereas the nodal point location had little effect. H1-H2 increased as a function of separation of the vocal processes in the range of 1.0mmto 1.5mmand decreased with separation >1.5 mm. Conclusions: CPP is generally a function of vocal process separation. H1*-H2* (see paragraph 6 of article text for an explanation of the asterisks) will increase or decrease with vocal process separation on the basis of vocal fold shape, pivot point for the rotational mode, and supraglottal vocal tract shape, limiting its utility as an indicator of breathy voice. Future work will relate the perception of breathiness to vocal fold kinematics and acoustic measures.

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