Relational communication, satisfaction, compliance-gaining strategies, and compliance in communication between physicians and patients

Judee K Burgoon, Michael Pfau, Roxanne Parrott, Thomas Birk, Ray Coker, Michael Burgoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Six themes of physicians’ relational communication were hypothesized to predict patients’ satisfaction and compliance, to relate to strategies used by physicians to gain compliance, and to relate to frequency of physician-patient contact. Telephone interviews with 234 adults who had seen a primary care physician within the previous six months confirmed that perceived relational communication was strongly related to affective, cognitive, and behavioral satisfaction. More expressions of receptivity, immediacy, composure, similarity, and formality and less dominance by the physician were associated with greater patient satisfaction. Only perceived similarity related to patient-reported compliance. Several relational message themes were associated with physicians’ use of 17 verbal compliance-gaining strategies. More prior contact also was associated with more perceived use of immediacy and receptivity messages by the physician and with more satisfaction. Finally, satisfaction was modestly correlated with compliance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-324
Number of pages18
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1987

Fingerprint

physician
communication
Communication
contact
Telephone
telephone interview
Compliance
Physicians
Compliance Gaining
Relational Communication
Immediacy
Receptivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Cite this

Relational communication, satisfaction, compliance-gaining strategies, and compliance in communication between physicians and patients. / Burgoon, Judee K; Pfau, Michael; Parrott, Roxanne; Birk, Thomas; Coker, Ray; Burgoon, Michael.

In: Communication Monographs, Vol. 54, No. 3, 01.09.1987, p. 307-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burgoon, Judee K ; Pfau, Michael ; Parrott, Roxanne ; Birk, Thomas ; Coker, Ray ; Burgoon, Michael. / Relational communication, satisfaction, compliance-gaining strategies, and compliance in communication between physicians and patients. In: Communication Monographs. 1987 ; Vol. 54, No. 3. pp. 307-324.
@article{cd8410b47d9a4f2f9468c38a163768a4,
title = "Relational communication, satisfaction, compliance-gaining strategies, and compliance in communication between physicians and patients",
abstract = "Six themes of physicians’ relational communication were hypothesized to predict patients’ satisfaction and compliance, to relate to strategies used by physicians to gain compliance, and to relate to frequency of physician-patient contact. Telephone interviews with 234 adults who had seen a primary care physician within the previous six months confirmed that perceived relational communication was strongly related to affective, cognitive, and behavioral satisfaction. More expressions of receptivity, immediacy, composure, similarity, and formality and less dominance by the physician were associated with greater patient satisfaction. Only perceived similarity related to patient-reported compliance. Several relational message themes were associated with physicians’ use of 17 verbal compliance-gaining strategies. More prior contact also was associated with more perceived use of immediacy and receptivity messages by the physician and with more satisfaction. Finally, satisfaction was modestly correlated with compliance.",
author = "Burgoon, {Judee K} and Michael Pfau and Roxanne Parrott and Thomas Birk and Ray Coker and Michael Burgoon",
year = "1987",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/03637758709390235",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "307--324",
journal = "Communication Monographs",
issn = "0363-7751",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relational communication, satisfaction, compliance-gaining strategies, and compliance in communication between physicians and patients

AU - Burgoon, Judee K

AU - Pfau, Michael

AU - Parrott, Roxanne

AU - Birk, Thomas

AU - Coker, Ray

AU - Burgoon, Michael

PY - 1987/9/1

Y1 - 1987/9/1

N2 - Six themes of physicians’ relational communication were hypothesized to predict patients’ satisfaction and compliance, to relate to strategies used by physicians to gain compliance, and to relate to frequency of physician-patient contact. Telephone interviews with 234 adults who had seen a primary care physician within the previous six months confirmed that perceived relational communication was strongly related to affective, cognitive, and behavioral satisfaction. More expressions of receptivity, immediacy, composure, similarity, and formality and less dominance by the physician were associated with greater patient satisfaction. Only perceived similarity related to patient-reported compliance. Several relational message themes were associated with physicians’ use of 17 verbal compliance-gaining strategies. More prior contact also was associated with more perceived use of immediacy and receptivity messages by the physician and with more satisfaction. Finally, satisfaction was modestly correlated with compliance.

AB - Six themes of physicians’ relational communication were hypothesized to predict patients’ satisfaction and compliance, to relate to strategies used by physicians to gain compliance, and to relate to frequency of physician-patient contact. Telephone interviews with 234 adults who had seen a primary care physician within the previous six months confirmed that perceived relational communication was strongly related to affective, cognitive, and behavioral satisfaction. More expressions of receptivity, immediacy, composure, similarity, and formality and less dominance by the physician were associated with greater patient satisfaction. Only perceived similarity related to patient-reported compliance. Several relational message themes were associated with physicians’ use of 17 verbal compliance-gaining strategies. More prior contact also was associated with more perceived use of immediacy and receptivity messages by the physician and with more satisfaction. Finally, satisfaction was modestly correlated with compliance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0000234354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0000234354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/03637758709390235

DO - 10.1080/03637758709390235

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0000234354

VL - 54

SP - 307

EP - 324

JO - Communication Monographs

JF - Communication Monographs

SN - 0363-7751

IS - 3

ER -