Religion and attitudes toward physician-assisted suicide and terminal palliative care

Amy M. Burdette, Terrence D. Hill, Benjamin E. Moulton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

We assess religious differences in attitudes toward physician-assisted suicide and terminal palliative care, and go further than previous research by attempting to explain these variations. Using data from the 1998 General Social Survey, we fit OLS regression models to estimate the main effects of religious affiliation and indirect effects via religious involvement (church attendance and strength of affiliation). Both conservative and moderate Protestants are generally less accepting of physician-assisted suicide and terminal palliative care than nonaffiliates. However, both relationships are at least partially explained by church attendance and/or strength of affiliation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-93
Number of pages15
JournalJournal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies

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