Religiosity and adolescent substance use: Evidence from the national survey on drug use and health

Jason A. Ford, Terrence D. Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior research indicates that religiosity is associated with lower levels of substance use in adolescence. The extant research, however, is limited by issues related to data quality and analytic strategy. The current research uses the National Survey on Drug Use and Health to further our understanding of the nature of the relationship between religiosity and substance use during adolescence. Results show that religiosity reduces the odds of tobacco use, heavy drinking, prescription drug misuse, marijuana use, and other illicit drug use. These associations are partially explained by respondent and peer attitudes toward substance use and, to a lesser extent, respondent psychological well-being. The influence of respondent substance use attitude is especially pronounced, explaining between 41% (marijuana) and 53% (tobacco) of the association between religiosity and substance use. In fully adjusted models, all mediators account for between 46% (marijuana) and 59% (tobacco) of the association between religiosity and substance use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)787-798
Number of pages12
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume47
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Religiosity
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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