Religious Attendance and the Social Support Trajectories of Older Mexican Americans

Terrence D. Hill, Christopher S. Bradley, Benjamin Dowd-Arrow, Amy M. Burdette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, we directly assessed the extent to which the association between religious attendance and the social support trajectories of older Mexican Americans is due to selection (spurious) processes related to personality, health status, and health behavior. We employed seven waves of data from the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (1993–2010) to examine the association between religious attendance and perceived social support trajectories (n = 2479). We used growth mixture modeling to estimate latent classes of social support trajectories and multivariate multinomial logistic regression models to predict membership in the social support trajectory classes. Growth mixture estimates revealed three classes of social support trajectories: high, moderate, and low. Multinomial logistic regression estimates showed that the odds of membership in the low support trajectory class (versus the high social support trajectory class) were lower for respondents who attended religious services yearly, monthly, weekly, and more than weekly than for respondents who never attend religious services. Religious attendance could not distinguish between membership in the moderate and high support trajectory classes. These results persisted with adjustments for age, gender, immigrant status, language proficiency, education, income, religious affiliation, marital status, living arrangements, contact with family/friends, secular group memberships, self-esteem, smoking, heavy drinking, depression, cognitive functioning, and physical mobility. We conclude that the association between religious attendance and the social support trajectories of older Mexican Americans is primarily driven by processes related to social integration, not selection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-416
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of cross-cultural gerontology
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

Social Support
social support
Logistic Models
logistics
regression
lower class
language education
Health Behavior
Marital Status
denomination
social integration
life situation
Growth
health behavior
marital status
Hispanic Americans
Self Concept
group membership
Health Status
Drinking

Keywords

  • Mexican American
  • Religion
  • Selection
  • Social integration
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Religious Attendance and the Social Support Trajectories of Older Mexican Americans. / Hill, Terrence D.; Bradley, Christopher S.; Dowd-Arrow, Benjamin; Burdette, Amy M.

In: Journal of cross-cultural gerontology, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.12.2019, p. 403-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hill, Terrence D. ; Bradley, Christopher S. ; Dowd-Arrow, Benjamin ; Burdette, Amy M. / Religious Attendance and the Social Support Trajectories of Older Mexican Americans. In: Journal of cross-cultural gerontology. 2019 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 403-416.
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