Religious Involvement and Perceptions of Control: Evidence from the Miami-Dade Health Survey

Anita E. Pascoe, Terrence D. Hill, Krysia N. Mossakowski, Robert J. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study uses data collected through the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to test whether religious involvement is associated with three distinct control beliefs. Regression results suggest that people who exhibit high levels of religious involvement tend to report higher levels of the sense of control, self-control, and the health locus of control than respondents who exhibit low levels of religious involvement. Although this study suggests that religious involvement can promote perceptions of control over one’s own life, this pattern is apparently concentrated at the high end of the distribution for religious involvement, indicating a threshold effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)862-873
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Keywords

  • Health locus of control
  • Religious involvement
  • Self-control
  • Sense of control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

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