Religious Involvement and Perceptions of Control: Evidence from the Miami-Dade Health Survey

Anita E. Pascoe, Terrence Hill, Krysia N. Mossakowski, Robert J. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study uses data collected through the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to test whether religious involvement is associated with three distinct control beliefs. Regression results suggest that people who exhibit high levels of religious involvement tend to report higher levels of the sense of control, self-control, and the health locus of control than respondents who exhibit low levels of religious involvement. Although this study suggests that religious involvement can promote perceptions of control over one’s own life, this pattern is apparently concentrated at the high end of the distribution for religious involvement, indicating a threshold effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 29 2015

Fingerprint

Internal-External Control
Health Surveys
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Self-Control
Miami
Religion

Keywords

  • Health locus of control
  • Religious involvement
  • Self-control
  • Sense of control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Religious Involvement and Perceptions of Control : Evidence from the Miami-Dade Health Survey. / Pascoe, Anita E.; Hill, Terrence; Mossakowski, Krysia N.; Johnson, Robert J.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, 29.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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