Remembering all that and then some: Recollection of autobiographical memories after a 1-year delay

Jenna Campbell, Lynn Nadel, Devin Duke, Lee Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have previously shown that repeated retrievals of remote autobiographical memories over the course of one month led to an overall increase in reported detail (Nadel, Campbell, & Ryan, 2007). The current study examined the retrieval of those same memories 1 year later in order to determine whether the level of detail remained stable or whether the memories returned to their original state. Participants reported even more details than they had recalled at least 1 year earlier, including new details that were reported for the first time. This finding was consistent across both multiple and single retrieval conditions, suggesting that the critical factor leading to the increase in recall was the passage of time. These findings provide evidence for long-term effects of repeated retrieval on memory content.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-415
Number of pages10
JournalMemory
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

Keywords

  • Autobiographical memory
  • Hypermnesia
  • Long-term memory
  • Memory consolidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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