Remembering our shared past: Visually framing the Iraq war on U.S. news websites

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This exploratory study analyzes how United States news websites visually portray ongoing (contemporaneous) events and examines their potential role in shaping collective memory by commemorating past (resurrected) events through anniversary retrospectives. A content analysis of 526 images on the home pages of 26 mainstream news sites indicates that during the first five weeks of the Iraq War, the visual emphasis shifted from the official U.S. war machine to the more personal face of those touched by war, both Americans and Iraqis, as photojournalists traveled with the troops to Baghdad. The five main frames that emerged reinforced the patriotic, government-friendly war narrative: conflict, conquest, rescue, victory, and control. By the first, second, and third anniversaries of the war, the visual coverage of hostilities had dropped dramatically. This article discusses some of the reasons why online news sites did not feature many anniversary commemorations of the Iraq War.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)264-289
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Computer-Mediated Communication
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Websites
Data storage equipment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Remembering our shared past : Visually framing the Iraq war on U.S. news websites. / Schwalbe, Carol B.

In: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, Vol. 12, No. 1, 10.2006, p. 264-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{fb92f81e504b42799766101f3dda9923,
title = "Remembering our shared past: Visually framing the Iraq war on U.S. news websites",
abstract = "This exploratory study analyzes how United States news websites visually portray ongoing (contemporaneous) events and examines their potential role in shaping collective memory by commemorating past (resurrected) events through anniversary retrospectives. A content analysis of 526 images on the home pages of 26 mainstream news sites indicates that during the first five weeks of the Iraq War, the visual emphasis shifted from the official U.S. war machine to the more personal face of those touched by war, both Americans and Iraqis, as photojournalists traveled with the troops to Baghdad. The five main frames that emerged reinforced the patriotic, government-friendly war narrative: conflict, conquest, rescue, victory, and control. By the first, second, and third anniversaries of the war, the visual coverage of hostilities had dropped dramatically. This article discusses some of the reasons why online news sites did not feature many anniversary commemorations of the Iraq War.",
author = "Schwalbe, {Carol B}",
year = "2006",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1111/j.1083-6101.2006.00325.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "264--289",
journal = "Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication",
issn = "1083-6101",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Remembering our shared past

T2 - Visually framing the Iraq war on U.S. news websites

AU - Schwalbe, Carol B

PY - 2006/10

Y1 - 2006/10

N2 - This exploratory study analyzes how United States news websites visually portray ongoing (contemporaneous) events and examines their potential role in shaping collective memory by commemorating past (resurrected) events through anniversary retrospectives. A content analysis of 526 images on the home pages of 26 mainstream news sites indicates that during the first five weeks of the Iraq War, the visual emphasis shifted from the official U.S. war machine to the more personal face of those touched by war, both Americans and Iraqis, as photojournalists traveled with the troops to Baghdad. The five main frames that emerged reinforced the patriotic, government-friendly war narrative: conflict, conquest, rescue, victory, and control. By the first, second, and third anniversaries of the war, the visual coverage of hostilities had dropped dramatically. This article discusses some of the reasons why online news sites did not feature many anniversary commemorations of the Iraq War.

AB - This exploratory study analyzes how United States news websites visually portray ongoing (contemporaneous) events and examines their potential role in shaping collective memory by commemorating past (resurrected) events through anniversary retrospectives. A content analysis of 526 images on the home pages of 26 mainstream news sites indicates that during the first five weeks of the Iraq War, the visual emphasis shifted from the official U.S. war machine to the more personal face of those touched by war, both Americans and Iraqis, as photojournalists traveled with the troops to Baghdad. The five main frames that emerged reinforced the patriotic, government-friendly war narrative: conflict, conquest, rescue, victory, and control. By the first, second, and third anniversaries of the war, the visual coverage of hostilities had dropped dramatically. This article discusses some of the reasons why online news sites did not feature many anniversary commemorations of the Iraq War.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34247847879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34247847879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2006.00325.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2006.00325.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:34247847879

VL - 12

SP - 264

EP - 289

JO - Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

JF - Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

SN - 1083-6101

IS - 1

ER -