Remembering the Initial Realization of One's Own Mortality

Melissa Soenke, Jeff L Greenberg, Elizabeth S. Focella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research shows many effects of reminding people of their mortality; however, little is known about whether people recall the moment they first realized they will die, or what factors are associated with whether they do. Data from 1,552 undergraduates and a community sample of 149 adults found that about one third of participants reported remembering the moment. Individuals who recall the moment have slightly lower self-esteem, are more likely to believe in a soul, and are more prone to dissociation than those who do not. Further research into how recollection of the moment relates to psychological well-being is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)648-653
Number of pages6
JournalDeath Studies
Volume38
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Mortality
Research
Self Concept
Psychology
Remembering
Undergraduate
Self-esteem
Dissociation
Psychological Well-being
Recollection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Remembering the Initial Realization of One's Own Mortality. / Soenke, Melissa; Greenberg, Jeff L; Focella, Elizabeth S.

In: Death Studies, Vol. 38, No. 10, 01.01.2014, p. 648-653.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soenke, Melissa ; Greenberg, Jeff L ; Focella, Elizabeth S. / Remembering the Initial Realization of One's Own Mortality. In: Death Studies. 2014 ; Vol. 38, No. 10. pp. 648-653.
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