Removal of emerging contaminants of concern by alternative adsorbents

Alfred Rossner, Shane A Snyder, Detlef R U Knappe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

148 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effective removal of emerging contaminants of concern (ECCs) such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals, pharmaceutically active compounds, personal care products, and flame retardants is a desirable water treatment goal. In this study, one activated carbon, one carbonaceous resin, and two high-silica zeolites were studied to evaluate their effectiveness for the removal of an ECC mixture from lake water. Adsorption isotherm experiments were performed with a mixture of 28 ECCs at environmentally relevant concentrations (∼200-900 ng/L). Among the tested adsorbents, activated carbon was the most effective, and activated carbon doses typically used for taste and odor control in drinking water (<10 mg/L) were sufficient to achieve a 2-log removal for most of the tested ECCs. The carbonaceous resin was less effective than the activated carbon because this adsorbent had a smaller volume of pores in the size range required for the adsorption of many ECCs (∼6-9 Å). For the removal of ECC mixture constituents, zeolites were less effective than the carbonaceous adsorbents. Because zeolites contain pores of uniform size and shape, a few of the tested ECCs with matching pore size/shape requirements were well removed, but the adsorptive removal of others was negligible, even at zeolite doses of 100 mg/L. The results of this study demonstrate that effective adsorbents for the removal of a broad spectrum of ECCs from water should exhibit heterogeneity in pore size and shape and a large pore volume in the 6-9 Å size range.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3787-3796
Number of pages10
JournalWater Research
Volume43
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Adsorbents
Impurities
pollutant
Activated carbon
activated carbon
Zeolites
Taste control (water treatment)
range size
Pore size
resin
Carbonaceous adsorbents
Resins
Odor control
adsorption
removal
Flame retardants
Water treatment
Adsorption isotherms
Potable water
zeolite

Keywords

  • Activated carbon
  • Adsorption
  • Drinking water treatment
  • Emerging contaminants
  • Zeolites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Ecological Modeling

Cite this

Removal of emerging contaminants of concern by alternative adsorbents. / Rossner, Alfred; Snyder, Shane A; Knappe, Detlef R U.

In: Water Research, Vol. 43, No. 15, 08.2009, p. 3787-3796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rossner, Alfred ; Snyder, Shane A ; Knappe, Detlef R U. / Removal of emerging contaminants of concern by alternative adsorbents. In: Water Research. 2009 ; Vol. 43, No. 15. pp. 3787-3796.
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