Removal of MS-2 and PRD-1 bacteriophages from an ultrapure water system

R. A. Governal, Charles P Gerba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Viruses must be removed from the ultrapure water environment, as they have the potential to deposit on microelectronic devices and generate killer defects. Controlled and well-defined challenges by MS-2 and PRD-1 bacteriophages were treated in a pilot-scale ultrapure water system using ultraviolet radiation (UV), ozone, mixed bed ion exchange adsorption, and reverse osmosis filtration technologies typical of those used in industrial systems. ApplyIng a first order kinetic model to the data generated rate constants for MS-2 removal by UV-185, 50 mg L-1 ozone, mixed bed ion exchange or reverse osmosis filtration of 15.5, 12.9, 3.9, and 10.4 min-1, respectively, and PRD-1 removal of 13.8, 15.5, 8.2, and 11.9 min-1, respectively. In all cases, removal of viruses by oxidative mechanisms such as ozone and UV were far superior to adsorption and filtration mechanisms. A theoretical viral population balance was generated to model the removal of the bacteriophages by these unit operations. This model relates the inlet time-dependent profile of viruses to the output, destruction, and accumulation profiles; it also relates these profiles to the unit operation's treatment mechanisms including oxidation, adsorption, and filtration. This model is the first step in generating a site-independent theoretical model to project the persistence of viruses in ultrapure water systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-172
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Bacteriophages
Ozone
Viruses
Osmosis
Adsorption
Water
Ultraviolet radiation
Ion Exchange
Radiation
Reverse osmosis
Ion exchange
Theoretical Models
Microelectronics
Rate constants
Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Deposits
Oxidation
Defects
Kinetics

Keywords

  • Coliphage
  • Inactivation
  • Ion exchange
  • Ozone
  • Reverse osmosis
  • Ultraviolet light (UV)
  • Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Removal of MS-2 and PRD-1 bacteriophages from an ultrapure water system. / Governal, R. A.; Gerba, Charles P.

In: Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, Vol. 23, No. 3, 1999, p. 166-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a24929994cf7463bb38d5f901d799897,
title = "Removal of MS-2 and PRD-1 bacteriophages from an ultrapure water system",
abstract = "Viruses must be removed from the ultrapure water environment, as they have the potential to deposit on microelectronic devices and generate killer defects. Controlled and well-defined challenges by MS-2 and PRD-1 bacteriophages were treated in a pilot-scale ultrapure water system using ultraviolet radiation (UV), ozone, mixed bed ion exchange adsorption, and reverse osmosis filtration technologies typical of those used in industrial systems. ApplyIng a first order kinetic model to the data generated rate constants for MS-2 removal by UV-185, 50 mg L-1 ozone, mixed bed ion exchange or reverse osmosis filtration of 15.5, 12.9, 3.9, and 10.4 min-1, respectively, and PRD-1 removal of 13.8, 15.5, 8.2, and 11.9 min-1, respectively. In all cases, removal of viruses by oxidative mechanisms such as ozone and UV were far superior to adsorption and filtration mechanisms. A theoretical viral population balance was generated to model the removal of the bacteriophages by these unit operations. This model relates the inlet time-dependent profile of viruses to the output, destruction, and accumulation profiles; it also relates these profiles to the unit operation's treatment mechanisms including oxidation, adsorption, and filtration. This model is the first step in generating a site-independent theoretical model to project the persistence of viruses in ultrapure water systems.",
keywords = "Coliphage, Inactivation, Ion exchange, Ozone, Reverse osmosis, Ultraviolet light (UV), Viruses",
author = "Governal, {R. A.} and Gerba, {Charles P}",
year = "1999",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "166--172",
journal = "Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology",
issn = "1367-5435",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Removal of MS-2 and PRD-1 bacteriophages from an ultrapure water system

AU - Governal, R. A.

AU - Gerba, Charles P

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Viruses must be removed from the ultrapure water environment, as they have the potential to deposit on microelectronic devices and generate killer defects. Controlled and well-defined challenges by MS-2 and PRD-1 bacteriophages were treated in a pilot-scale ultrapure water system using ultraviolet radiation (UV), ozone, mixed bed ion exchange adsorption, and reverse osmosis filtration technologies typical of those used in industrial systems. ApplyIng a first order kinetic model to the data generated rate constants for MS-2 removal by UV-185, 50 mg L-1 ozone, mixed bed ion exchange or reverse osmosis filtration of 15.5, 12.9, 3.9, and 10.4 min-1, respectively, and PRD-1 removal of 13.8, 15.5, 8.2, and 11.9 min-1, respectively. In all cases, removal of viruses by oxidative mechanisms such as ozone and UV were far superior to adsorption and filtration mechanisms. A theoretical viral population balance was generated to model the removal of the bacteriophages by these unit operations. This model relates the inlet time-dependent profile of viruses to the output, destruction, and accumulation profiles; it also relates these profiles to the unit operation's treatment mechanisms including oxidation, adsorption, and filtration. This model is the first step in generating a site-independent theoretical model to project the persistence of viruses in ultrapure water systems.

AB - Viruses must be removed from the ultrapure water environment, as they have the potential to deposit on microelectronic devices and generate killer defects. Controlled and well-defined challenges by MS-2 and PRD-1 bacteriophages were treated in a pilot-scale ultrapure water system using ultraviolet radiation (UV), ozone, mixed bed ion exchange adsorption, and reverse osmosis filtration technologies typical of those used in industrial systems. ApplyIng a first order kinetic model to the data generated rate constants for MS-2 removal by UV-185, 50 mg L-1 ozone, mixed bed ion exchange or reverse osmosis filtration of 15.5, 12.9, 3.9, and 10.4 min-1, respectively, and PRD-1 removal of 13.8, 15.5, 8.2, and 11.9 min-1, respectively. In all cases, removal of viruses by oxidative mechanisms such as ozone and UV were far superior to adsorption and filtration mechanisms. A theoretical viral population balance was generated to model the removal of the bacteriophages by these unit operations. This model relates the inlet time-dependent profile of viruses to the output, destruction, and accumulation profiles; it also relates these profiles to the unit operation's treatment mechanisms including oxidation, adsorption, and filtration. This model is the first step in generating a site-independent theoretical model to project the persistence of viruses in ultrapure water systems.

KW - Coliphage

KW - Inactivation

KW - Ion exchange

KW - Ozone

KW - Reverse osmosis

KW - Ultraviolet light (UV)

KW - Viruses

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032709815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032709815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0032709815

VL - 23

SP - 166

EP - 172

JO - Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology

JF - Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology

SN - 1367-5435

IS - 3

ER -