Report on the results of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for acute, complicated, type B aortic dissection at 30 days and 1 year from a multidisciplinary subcommittee of the Society for Vascular Surgery Outcomes Committee

Rodney A. White, D. Craig Miller, Frank J. Criado, Michael D. Dake, Edward B. Diethrich, Roy K. Greenberg, Rebecca S. Piccolo, Flora Sandra Siami

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123 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study analyzed 1-year outcome after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with complicated type B aortic dissection (cTBAoD) who had rupture or malperfusion and symptom onset ≤14 days (acute), 15 to 30 days (subacute), and 31 to 90 days (chronic) until required intervention. The main focus of this report is primarily on the acute cohort. Methods: Clinical data were systematically collected from five physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (IDE) clinical trials between 2000 and 2008 using standardized definitions and forms. Adverse events were reported early (≤30 days) and late (>30 days) by body system. Major adverse events included death, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal failure, respiratory failure, paralysis, and bowel ischemia. Results: There were 99 cTBAoD patients: 85 were acute, 11 were subacute, and 3 were chronic. Among the acute patients, 31.8% had rupture and 71.8% had malperfusion, including 55.7% lower extremity, 36.1% renal, 19.7% visceral, 8.2% other, and 3.3% spinal cord (patients may have more than one source). Rupture and malperfusion were both reported for three acute patients. Additional findings for the acute cohort included pain (76.5%), hypertension (43.5%), and bleeding (8.2%); comorbidities included hypertension (83.5%), current/past smoking history (69.8%), and diabetes (12.9%). The main focus of this analysis was the acute cohort (n = 85). Age averaged 59 years (72.9% male). Early adverse events included pulmonary (36.5%), vascular (28.2%), renal (25.9%), and neurologic (23.5%). Early major adverse events occurred in 37.6% of patients, including death (10.6%), stroke (9.4%), renal failure (9.4%), and paralysis (9.4%); late adverse events included vascular (15.8%), cardiac (10.5%), gastrointestinal (6.6%), and hemorrhage (5.3%). The point-estimate mortality rate was 10.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1-17.5) at 30 days and 29.4 (95% CI, 18.4-40.4) at 1 year, when 34 patients remained at risk. Conclusions: Emergency TEVAR for patients with cTBAoD (malperfusion or rupture) provided acceptable mortality and morbidity results out to 1 year. Manufacturers can use this 30-day mortality point-estimate of 10.8 (95% CI, 4.1-17.5) for the acute cohort to establish a performance goal for use in single-arm commercial IDE trials if the Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory bodies concur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1082-1090
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of vascular surgery
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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