Representation in Context: Constructing Victims’ Claims in the International Criminal Court

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drawing on recent criticisms of victim representation in the International Criminal Court (ICC), I examine the challenges of claim-making in a particular institutional context. I use this case study to make three points about Michael Saward’s general theory of representation. First, I argue that Saward’s general criteria need to be modified in light of an institution’s particular norms, capacities, and directives. Second, I show that retrospective claim-reception is insufficient for guaranteeing that the appropriate constituencies will have the “ultimate say” in claim-reception. Third, I illustrate how the quality of the relationship between the representative and represented can adversely impact the managerial function of representatives. In this way, I show how an institution’s features can importantly condition the representative claim.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-275
Number of pages13
JournalRepresentation
Volume53
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2017
Externally publishedYes

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International Criminal Court
criticism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Representation in Context : Constructing Victims’ Claims in the International Criminal Court. / Dovi, Suzanne L.

In: Representation, Vol. 53, No. 3-4, 02.10.2017, p. 263-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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