Reproductive success and eggshell thinning of a reestablished peregrine falcon population

Robert J Steidl, C. R. Griffin, L. J. Niles, K. E. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examined numbers of Falco peregrinus pairs, reproductive success, and eggshell thinning in New Jersey during 1979-88. Productivity of these falcons (mean 1.38 young fledged/pair) was comparable with that of stable populations, but productivity was lower for pairs near Delaware Bay and River (0.58 young/pair) compared to those in other regions of New Jersey (1.55 young/pair). Lower productivity and nest success of 4 pairs near Delaware Bay and River studied in both 1987 and 1988 were due to low hatching success and predation, probably by great horned owls Bubo virginianus. During 1985-88 eggshell thickness from New Jersey peregrines averaged 16.4% below pre-DDT levels and apparently has decreased steadily since 1979. This decrease in eggshell thickness statewide suggests that falcons continue to be exposed to environmental contaminants. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-299
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Wildlife Management
Volume55
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Falco peregrinus
eggshell
egg shell
Delaware River
Bubo virginianus
reproductive success
thinning
egg shell thickness
falcons
productivity
DDT
river
hatching
nest
predation
pollution
nests
pollutant
young
Delaware Bay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Reproductive success and eggshell thinning of a reestablished peregrine falcon population. / Steidl, Robert J; Griffin, C. R.; Niles, L. J.; Clark, K. E.

In: Journal of Wildlife Management, Vol. 55, No. 2, 1991, p. 294-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steidl, Robert J ; Griffin, C. R. ; Niles, L. J. ; Clark, K. E. / Reproductive success and eggshell thinning of a reestablished peregrine falcon population. In: Journal of Wildlife Management. 1991 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 294-299.
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