Research agenda for violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women: Toward the development of strength-based and resilience interventions

Nicole P Yuan, Annie Belcourt-Dittloff, Katie Schultz, Gwendolyn Packard, Bonnie M. Duran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Exposure to violence threatens the health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women and children. In the first part of the commentary, we provide a brief overview of research, policies, and programs aimed at reducing violence against AI/AN women. In the second part, we present 3 recommendations for an expanded research agenda. The first recommendation is to promote participatory research on risk and protective factors to inform the development of culturally appropriate, strength-based and resilience interventions. The second recommendation is to increase applications of life course theories and examine the interconnectedness between intimate partner violence (IPV) and violence exposures that occur during childhood and older adulthood. The third recommendation is to conduct more studies on social and historical determinants of violence, with an emphasis on community and societal factors. Conclusions: Increased applications of theoretical frameworks may shed light on social, economic, historical, and cultural factors associated with violence against AI/AN women. Incorporating the factors in IPV prevention and intervention programs requires active participation and indigenous knowledge from AI/AN scholars, leaders, advocates, and communities. Diverse stakeholders play an important role in promoting the use of cultural strengths to improve the health and safety of AI/AN women and families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-373
Number of pages7
JournalPsychology of Violence
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

North American Indians
American Indian
Violence
resilience
violence
Research
Health
research policy
Economics
cultural factors
Alaska Natives
health
social economics
adulthood
Safety
community
well-being
childhood
stakeholder
determinants

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • intimate partner violence
  • participatory research
  • resiliency
  • violence against women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Research agenda for violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women : Toward the development of strength-based and resilience interventions. / Yuan, Nicole P; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie; Schultz, Katie; Packard, Gwendolyn; Duran, Bonnie M.

In: Psychology of Violence, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. 367-373.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yuan, Nicole P ; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie ; Schultz, Katie ; Packard, Gwendolyn ; Duran, Bonnie M. / Research agenda for violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women : Toward the development of strength-based and resilience interventions. In: Psychology of Violence. 2015 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 367-373.
@article{8c68ee8e373c4216acb56ff16b26147d,
title = "Research agenda for violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women: Toward the development of strength-based and resilience interventions",
abstract = "Objective: Exposure to violence threatens the health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women and children. In the first part of the commentary, we provide a brief overview of research, policies, and programs aimed at reducing violence against AI/AN women. In the second part, we present 3 recommendations for an expanded research agenda. The first recommendation is to promote participatory research on risk and protective factors to inform the development of culturally appropriate, strength-based and resilience interventions. The second recommendation is to increase applications of life course theories and examine the interconnectedness between intimate partner violence (IPV) and violence exposures that occur during childhood and older adulthood. The third recommendation is to conduct more studies on social and historical determinants of violence, with an emphasis on community and societal factors. Conclusions: Increased applications of theoretical frameworks may shed light on social, economic, historical, and cultural factors associated with violence against AI/AN women. Incorporating the factors in IPV prevention and intervention programs requires active participation and indigenous knowledge from AI/AN scholars, leaders, advocates, and communities. Diverse stakeholders play an important role in promoting the use of cultural strengths to improve the health and safety of AI/AN women and families.",
keywords = "American Indian, intimate partner violence, participatory research, resiliency, violence against women",
author = "Yuan, {Nicole P} and Annie Belcourt-Dittloff and Katie Schultz and Gwendolyn Packard and Duran, {Bonnie M.}",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/a0038507",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "367--373",
journal = "Psychology of Violence",
issn = "2152-0828",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Research agenda for violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women

T2 - Toward the development of strength-based and resilience interventions

AU - Yuan, Nicole P

AU - Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie

AU - Schultz, Katie

AU - Packard, Gwendolyn

AU - Duran, Bonnie M.

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - Objective: Exposure to violence threatens the health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women and children. In the first part of the commentary, we provide a brief overview of research, policies, and programs aimed at reducing violence against AI/AN women. In the second part, we present 3 recommendations for an expanded research agenda. The first recommendation is to promote participatory research on risk and protective factors to inform the development of culturally appropriate, strength-based and resilience interventions. The second recommendation is to increase applications of life course theories and examine the interconnectedness between intimate partner violence (IPV) and violence exposures that occur during childhood and older adulthood. The third recommendation is to conduct more studies on social and historical determinants of violence, with an emphasis on community and societal factors. Conclusions: Increased applications of theoretical frameworks may shed light on social, economic, historical, and cultural factors associated with violence against AI/AN women. Incorporating the factors in IPV prevention and intervention programs requires active participation and indigenous knowledge from AI/AN scholars, leaders, advocates, and communities. Diverse stakeholders play an important role in promoting the use of cultural strengths to improve the health and safety of AI/AN women and families.

AB - Objective: Exposure to violence threatens the health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women and children. In the first part of the commentary, we provide a brief overview of research, policies, and programs aimed at reducing violence against AI/AN women. In the second part, we present 3 recommendations for an expanded research agenda. The first recommendation is to promote participatory research on risk and protective factors to inform the development of culturally appropriate, strength-based and resilience interventions. The second recommendation is to increase applications of life course theories and examine the interconnectedness between intimate partner violence (IPV) and violence exposures that occur during childhood and older adulthood. The third recommendation is to conduct more studies on social and historical determinants of violence, with an emphasis on community and societal factors. Conclusions: Increased applications of theoretical frameworks may shed light on social, economic, historical, and cultural factors associated with violence against AI/AN women. Incorporating the factors in IPV prevention and intervention programs requires active participation and indigenous knowledge from AI/AN scholars, leaders, advocates, and communities. Diverse stakeholders play an important role in promoting the use of cultural strengths to improve the health and safety of AI/AN women and families.

KW - American Indian

KW - intimate partner violence

KW - participatory research

KW - resiliency

KW - violence against women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84943266527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84943266527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0038507

DO - 10.1037/a0038507

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84943266527

VL - 5

SP - 367

EP - 373

JO - Psychology of Violence

JF - Psychology of Violence

SN - 2152-0828

IS - 4

ER -