Resistance exercise training is associated with decreases in serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in premenopausal women

Thomas W. Boyden, Richard W. Pamenter, Scott B Going, Timothy G Lohman, Matthew C. Hall, Linda K Houtkooper, Joy C. Bunt, Cheryl Ritenbaugh, Mikel Aickin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Aerobic exercise training is associated with reduced serum concentrations of triglycerides, increased concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and minimal changes in serum levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are few data on the effects of resistance exercise on blood lipid levels. Methods: Premenopausal women were randomly assigned to a supervised resistance exercise training program (n=46) or a control group (n=42) for 5 months. Serum was analyzed for levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. Body composition and dietary intake were also measured. Results: The exercise group showed a 0.33±0.03-mmol/L (mean±SE) decrease in total cholesterol level and a 0.36±0.001-mmol/L decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level that was significantly different from the control group. No significant changes were noted in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglyceride levels in either group. Changes in body composition showed no significant correlations with changes in total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There were no significant differences in nutrient intake between the groups. Conclusion: In healthy, premenopausal women, with normal baseline lipid profiles, 5 months of resistance exercise training was associated with significant decreases in serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-100
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume153
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 11 1993

Fingerprint

Resistance Training
LDL Cholesterol
Exercise
Cholesterol
Serum
HDL Cholesterol
Body Composition
Lipids
Control Groups
Triglycerides
Education
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Resistance exercise training is associated with decreases in serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in premenopausal women. / Boyden, Thomas W.; Pamenter, Richard W.; Going, Scott B; Lohman, Timothy G; Hall, Matthew C.; Houtkooper, Linda K; Bunt, Joy C.; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Aickin, Mikel.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 153, No. 1, 11.01.1993, p. 97-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boyden, Thomas W. ; Pamenter, Richard W. ; Going, Scott B ; Lohman, Timothy G ; Hall, Matthew C. ; Houtkooper, Linda K ; Bunt, Joy C. ; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl ; Aickin, Mikel. / Resistance exercise training is associated with decreases in serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in premenopausal women. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1993 ; Vol. 153, No. 1. pp. 97-100.
@article{f70eb0cdd320404e8d08c89a6a3bf3cb,
title = "Resistance exercise training is associated with decreases in serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in premenopausal women",
abstract = "Background: Aerobic exercise training is associated with reduced serum concentrations of triglycerides, increased concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and minimal changes in serum levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are few data on the effects of resistance exercise on blood lipid levels. Methods: Premenopausal women were randomly assigned to a supervised resistance exercise training program (n=46) or a control group (n=42) for 5 months. Serum was analyzed for levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. Body composition and dietary intake were also measured. Results: The exercise group showed a 0.33±0.03-mmol/L (mean±SE) decrease in total cholesterol level and a 0.36±0.001-mmol/L decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level that was significantly different from the control group. No significant changes were noted in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglyceride levels in either group. Changes in body composition showed no significant correlations with changes in total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There were no significant differences in nutrient intake between the groups. Conclusion: In healthy, premenopausal women, with normal baseline lipid profiles, 5 months of resistance exercise training was associated with significant decreases in serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.",
author = "Boyden, {Thomas W.} and Pamenter, {Richard W.} and Going, {Scott B} and Lohman, {Timothy G} and Hall, {Matthew C.} and Houtkooper, {Linda K} and Bunt, {Joy C.} and Cheryl Ritenbaugh and Mikel Aickin",
year = "1993",
month = "1",
day = "11",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "153",
pages = "97--100",
journal = "JAMA Internal Medicine",
issn = "2168-6106",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resistance exercise training is associated with decreases in serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in premenopausal women

AU - Boyden, Thomas W.

AU - Pamenter, Richard W.

AU - Going, Scott B

AU - Lohman, Timothy G

AU - Hall, Matthew C.

AU - Houtkooper, Linda K

AU - Bunt, Joy C.

AU - Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

AU - Aickin, Mikel

PY - 1993/1/11

Y1 - 1993/1/11

N2 - Background: Aerobic exercise training is associated with reduced serum concentrations of triglycerides, increased concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and minimal changes in serum levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are few data on the effects of resistance exercise on blood lipid levels. Methods: Premenopausal women were randomly assigned to a supervised resistance exercise training program (n=46) or a control group (n=42) for 5 months. Serum was analyzed for levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. Body composition and dietary intake were also measured. Results: The exercise group showed a 0.33±0.03-mmol/L (mean±SE) decrease in total cholesterol level and a 0.36±0.001-mmol/L decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level that was significantly different from the control group. No significant changes were noted in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglyceride levels in either group. Changes in body composition showed no significant correlations with changes in total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There were no significant differences in nutrient intake between the groups. Conclusion: In healthy, premenopausal women, with normal baseline lipid profiles, 5 months of resistance exercise training was associated with significant decreases in serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.

AB - Background: Aerobic exercise training is associated with reduced serum concentrations of triglycerides, increased concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and minimal changes in serum levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are few data on the effects of resistance exercise on blood lipid levels. Methods: Premenopausal women were randomly assigned to a supervised resistance exercise training program (n=46) or a control group (n=42) for 5 months. Serum was analyzed for levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. Body composition and dietary intake were also measured. Results: The exercise group showed a 0.33±0.03-mmol/L (mean±SE) decrease in total cholesterol level and a 0.36±0.001-mmol/L decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level that was significantly different from the control group. No significant changes were noted in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglyceride levels in either group. Changes in body composition showed no significant correlations with changes in total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There were no significant differences in nutrient intake between the groups. Conclusion: In healthy, premenopausal women, with normal baseline lipid profiles, 5 months of resistance exercise training was associated with significant decreases in serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027404453&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027404453&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8422204

AN - SCOPUS:0027404453

VL - 153

SP - 97

EP - 100

JO - JAMA Internal Medicine

JF - JAMA Internal Medicine

SN - 2168-6106

IS - 1

ER -