Resistance to bacterial and parasitic infections in the nutritionally compromised host.

Ronald R Watson, T. M. Petro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past few years the relationships and interactions of diet, disease, and immunology are becoming better defined with the development and understanding of host defenses. Nutritional state, immunity, and disease all influence each other in the hospitalized patient, the elderly, and the young. Disease can alter nutritional needs and immune responses to antigens. The roles of both dietary excesses and deficiencies on cellular, secretory, and humoral immune responses are related to diseases and disease incidence in humans and experimental animals. Malnutrition alters incidence and severity of fungal, bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens. The mechanisms of altered disease resistance in nutritionally stressed animal models occurs via changes in the lymphoreticular endothelial system. The effects of common nutritional deficiencies, low protein, and low carbohydrate diets on antibody production, macrophage function, secretory IgA synthesis, and T-cell functions. Nutritional supplementation can increase lymphocyte function and decrease growth of some pathogens and tumors. Alternatively, obesity and high fat have roles in infectious disease and immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-315
Number of pages19
JournalCritical Reviews in Microbiology
Volume10
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1984

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Parasitic Diseases
Bacterial Infections
Malnutrition
Immunity
Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet
Secretory Immunoglobulin A
Disease Resistance
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
Incidence
Humoral Immunity
Allergy and Immunology
Cellular Immunity
Antibody Formation
Communicable Diseases
Animal Models
Obesity
Fats
Macrophages
Lymphocytes
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Resistance to bacterial and parasitic infections in the nutritionally compromised host. / Watson, Ronald R; Petro, T. M.

In: Critical Reviews in Microbiology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 1984, p. 297-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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