Respiratory Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain infection induces Th17 cells and prostaglandin E2, which inhibits generation of gamma interferon-positive T cells

Matthew D. Woolard, Lucinda L. Hensley, Thomas H. Kawula, Jeffrey A Frelinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two key routes of Francisella tularensis infection are through the skin and airway. We wished to understand how the route of inoculation influenced the primary acute adaptive immune response. We show that an intranasal inoculation of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) with a 1,000-fold-smaller dose than an intradermal dose results in similar growth kinetics and peak bacterial burdens. In spite of similar bacterial burdens, we demonstrate a difference in the quality, magnitude, and kinetics of the primary acute T-cell response depending on the route of inoculation. Further, we show that prostaglandin E2 secretion in the lung is responsible for the difference in the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response. Intradermal inoculation led to a large number of IFN-γ+ T cells 7 days after infection in both the spleen and the lung. In contrast, intranasal inoculation induced a lower number of IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen and lung but an increased number of Th17 cells in the lung. Intranasal infection also led to a significant increase of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Inhibition of PGE2 production with indomethacin treatment resulted in increased numbers of IFN-γ+ T cells and decreased bacteremia in the lungs of intranasally inoculated mice. This research illuminates critical differences in acute adaptive immune responses between inhalational and dermal infection with F. tularensis LVS mediated by the innate immune system and PGE2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2651-2659
Number of pages9
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume76
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Francisella tularensis
Th17 Cells
Dinoprostone
Interferon-gamma
Vaccines
T-Lymphocytes
Lung
Interferons
Tularemia
Infection
Adaptive Immunity
Spleen
Skin
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Bacteremia
Indomethacin
Immune System
Growth
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology
  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Respiratory Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain infection induces Th17 cells and prostaglandin E2, which inhibits generation of gamma interferon-positive T cells. / Woolard, Matthew D.; Hensley, Lucinda L.; Kawula, Thomas H.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 76, No. 6, 06.2008, p. 2651-2659.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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