Resting frontal electroencephalographic asymmetry in depression: Inconsistencies suggest the need to identify mediating factors

Stephanie A. Reid, Lisa M. Duke, John J.B. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

260 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two studies of the relationship between depression and resting frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) activity are reported. Although considerable research supports the theory of left and right hemispheric specialization for approach and withdrawal behaviors, only four studies involving clinically depressed individuals have been published to date. Despite methodological similarities with published research, no significant differences in frontal activation emerged between depressed and nondepressed participants with either college students having high Beck Depression Inventory scores (Study 1) or with individuals diagnosed with DSM-III-R depression (Study 2). Post hoc analyses in Study 2 revealed one effect confined to lateral frontal leads during the first 2 min of EEG data; this finding was significant in only one of three reference montages. Results are discussed in light of methodological considerations and mediating variables such as temperament and coping styles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-404
Number of pages16
JournalPSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 26 1998

Keywords

  • Electroencephalography
  • Emotion
  • Individual differences
  • Lateral dominance
  • Methodology
  • Psychophysiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

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