Restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with low physical activity levels. A population based international study

Anne Elie Carsin, Elaine Fuertes, Emmanuel Schaffner, Debbie Jarvis, Josep M. Antó, Joachim Heinrich, Valeria Bellisario, Cecilie Svanes, Dirk Keidel, Medea Imboden, Joost Weyler, Dennis Nowak, Jesus Martinez-Moratalla, José Antonio Gullón, José Luis Sanchez Ramos, Seraina Caviezel, Anna Beckmeyer-Borowko, Chantal Raherison, Isabelle Pin, Pascal DemolyIsa Cerveri, Simone Accordini, Thorarinn Gislason, Kjell Toren, Bertil Forsberg, Christer Janson, Rain Jogi, Margareta Emtner, Francisco Gómez Real, Wasif Raza, Bénédicte Leynaert, Silvia Pascual, Stefano Guerra, Shyamali C. Dharmage, Nicole Probst-Hensch, Judith Garcia-Aymerich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Restrictive spirometry pattern is an under-recognised disorder with a poor morbidity and mortality prognosis. We compared physical activity levels between adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern and with normal spirometry. Methods: Restrictive spirometry pattern was defined as a having post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ≥ Lower Limit of Normal and a FVC<80% predicted in two population-based studies (ECRHS-III and SAPALDIA3). Physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The odds of having low physical activity (<1st study-specific tertile) was evaluated using adjusted logistic regression models. Results: Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern (n = 280/4721 in ECRHS, n = 143/3570 in SAPALDIA) reported lower levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry (median of 1770 vs 2253 MET·min/week in ECRHS, and 3519 vs 3945 MET·min/week in SAPALDIA). Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low physical activity (meta-analysis odds ratio: 1.41 [95%CI 1.07–1.86]) than those with a normal spirometry. Obesity, respiratory symptoms, co-morbidities and previous physical activity levels did not fully explain this finding. Conclusion: Adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry. These results highlight the need to identify and act on this understudied but prevalent condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-123
Number of pages8
JournalRespiratory Medicine
Volume146
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Epidemiology
  • Lung function
  • Physical activity
  • Restrictive spirometry pattern

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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    Carsin, A. E., Fuertes, E., Schaffner, E., Jarvis, D., Antó, J. M., Heinrich, J., Bellisario, V., Svanes, C., Keidel, D., Imboden, M., Weyler, J., Nowak, D., Martinez-Moratalla, J., Gullón, J. A., Sanchez Ramos, J. L., Caviezel, S., Beckmeyer-Borowko, A., Raherison, C., Pin, I., ... Garcia-Aymerich, J. (2019). Restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with low physical activity levels. A population based international study. Respiratory Medicine, 146, 116-123. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2018.11.017