Rethinking religious divides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Notwithstanding the considerable body of scholarship on South Asian history that has appeared over the past several decades, we still live with the image of a monolithic and alien Islam colliding with an equally monolithic Hinduism, construed as indigenous, and from the eleventh century on, politically suppressed. Such a cardboard-cutout caricature survives in much of India's tabloid media, as well as in textbooks informed by a revivalist, aggressively political strand of Hinduism, or Hindutva. Though useful for stoking primordial identities or mobilizing support for political agendas, this caricature thrives on a pervasive ignorance of South Asia's past. Removing such ignorance is precisely the endeavor to which academic institutions, and scholarship more generally, are properly committed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-308
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Asian Studies
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Hinduism
eleventh century
political agenda
South Asia
Islam
textbook
India
history
Caricature
Ignorance
Religion
Revivalist
History
Cardboard
Political Agenda
Textbooks
Tabloids
Asia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • History

Cite this

Rethinking religious divides. / Eaton, Richard M.

In: Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 73, No. 2, 2014, p. 305-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eaton, Richard M. / Rethinking religious divides. In: Journal of Asian Studies. 2014 ; Vol. 73, No. 2. pp. 305-308.
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