Review of research studies that evaluated the impact of treatment for childhood cancers on neurocognition and behavioral and social competence: nursing implications.

J. Challinor, C. Miaskowski, I. Moore, R. Slaughter, L. Franck

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

ISSUES AND PURPOSE: Given the increasing incidence of childhood cancer, increasing survivor rates, and documented incidence of sequelae, nurses need evidence on which to base interventions for families at risk. The authors review and critique research studies that evaluated the impact of treatment for childhood cancers. Implications for nursing practice are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: Research to evaluate the effects of treatment on neurocognition and behavioral and social competency of children with cancer has produced conflicting results. Most studies found deleterious effects on all three areas associated with childhood cancer treatment. Some studies, however, found no differences between childhood cancer survivors and children on therapy compared to normative data or healthy controls. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Knowledge of the short- and long-term impact of treatment for childhood cancer on neurocognition and behavioral and social competence allows nurses to design interventions that mitigate neurocognitive effects, decrease behavioral problems, and improve social competence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-74
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of the Society of Pediatric Nurses : JSPN
Volume5
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this