Role clarity, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction during hospital reengineering.

M. Kroposki, Carolyn L Murdaugh, A. S. Tavakoli, M. Parsons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the relationships among role conflict, role ambiguity, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction experienced by clinical team members in a hospital undergoing reengineering. The sample consisted of 409 registered nurses (RNs) and 278 non-RNs. Participants who experienced much role conflict and ambiguity exhibited less organizational commitment and job satisfaction. RNs had more role conflict and ambiguity than non-RNs. No significant differences in role conflict and role ambiguity, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction were observed between RNs working on medical-surgical units and those on specialty units. Strategies that reduce role conflict and role ambiguity to increase organizational commitment and job satisfaction are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalNursingConnections
Volume12
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Job Satisfaction
Nurses
Nurse's Role
Conflict (Psychology)

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Role clarity, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction during hospital reengineering. / Kroposki, M.; Murdaugh, Carolyn L; Tavakoli, A. S.; Parsons, M.

In: NursingConnections, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1999, p. 27-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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