Role of the Q factor estimation in the field trial of 10 Gbit/s transmission at 1300 nm with semiconductor optical amplifiers between Madrid and Merida (460 km)

N. Goderb, M. Settembre, W. Laedke, F. Matera, M. Tamburrini, Ildar R Gabitov, H. Haunstein, J. Reid, S. Turitsyn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper deals with the crucial problem of comparing numerical evaluation of system performance with experimental measurements. At the moment numerical simulations permit to achieve good agreement with experiments in terms of signal evolution, but the comparison of the system performance in terms of error probability is still in progress especially when strong memory (patterning) effects are present. Advent and development of optical amplifiers have stimulated investigations of new techniques to evaluate transmission system performance. Existing operational optical systems can show no measured errors over long time intervals, that makes direct measurements of BERs almost impractical. Important role is then played by indirect methods to evaluate system performance. The most commonly used technique to evaluate system performance is Q-factor method. In its basic formulation it assumes a Gaussian noise distribution on both the zero and one levels. The optimal performance is determined by Q= (μ1-μ01+σ0). Here p1, cl0 are the means and σl,σ0 are the standard deviations of ones and zeros, respectively. BER is then calculated from Q-factor as B ER = 0.5 e rfc (Q √2) [ 11. This formulation has mainly two relatively weak points: The Gaussian hypothesis ad its unreliability when patterning effect are present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationOFC/IOOC 1999 - Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages325-327
Number of pages3
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)155752582X, 9781557525826
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes
Event1999 Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication, OFC/IOOC 1999 - San Diego, United States
Duration: Feb 21 1999Feb 26 1999

Other

Other1999 Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication, OFC/IOOC 1999
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period2/21/992/26/99

Fingerprint

Semiconductor optical amplifiers
light amplifiers
Q factors
Light amplifiers
Optical systems
Data storage equipment
Computer simulation
formulations
Experiments
random noise
standard deviation
intervals
moments
evaluation
Error probability
simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Instrumentation
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Goderb, N., Settembre, M., Laedke, W., Matera, F., Tamburrini, M., Gabitov, I. R., ... Turitsyn, S. (1999). Role of the Q factor estimation in the field trial of 10 Gbit/s transmission at 1300 nm with semiconductor optical amplifiers between Madrid and Merida (460 km). In OFC/IOOC 1999 - Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication (Vol. 2, pp. 325-327). [766428] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/OFC.1999.766428

Role of the Q factor estimation in the field trial of 10 Gbit/s transmission at 1300 nm with semiconductor optical amplifiers between Madrid and Merida (460 km). / Goderb, N.; Settembre, M.; Laedke, W.; Matera, F.; Tamburrini, M.; Gabitov, Ildar R; Haunstein, H.; Reid, J.; Turitsyn, S.

OFC/IOOC 1999 - Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication. Vol. 2 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 1999. p. 325-327 766428.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Goderb, N, Settembre, M, Laedke, W, Matera, F, Tamburrini, M, Gabitov, IR, Haunstein, H, Reid, J & Turitsyn, S 1999, Role of the Q factor estimation in the field trial of 10 Gbit/s transmission at 1300 nm with semiconductor optical amplifiers between Madrid and Merida (460 km). in OFC/IOOC 1999 - Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication. vol. 2, 766428, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 325-327, 1999 Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication, OFC/IOOC 1999, San Diego, United States, 2/21/99. https://doi.org/10.1109/OFC.1999.766428
Goderb N, Settembre M, Laedke W, Matera F, Tamburrini M, Gabitov IR et al. Role of the Q factor estimation in the field trial of 10 Gbit/s transmission at 1300 nm with semiconductor optical amplifiers between Madrid and Merida (460 km). In OFC/IOOC 1999 - Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication. Vol. 2. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 1999. p. 325-327. 766428 https://doi.org/10.1109/OFC.1999.766428
Goderb, N. ; Settembre, M. ; Laedke, W. ; Matera, F. ; Tamburrini, M. ; Gabitov, Ildar R ; Haunstein, H. ; Reid, J. ; Turitsyn, S. / Role of the Q factor estimation in the field trial of 10 Gbit/s transmission at 1300 nm with semiconductor optical amplifiers between Madrid and Merida (460 km). OFC/IOOC 1999 - Optical Fiber Communication Conference and the International Conference on Integrated Optics and Optical Fiber Communication. Vol. 2 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 1999. pp. 325-327
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