Role of time in self-prediction of behavior

Viswanath Venkatesh, Likoebe M. Maruping, Susan A Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines three specific manifestations of time-anticipation (proximal vs. distal), prior experience with the behavior, and frequency (episodic vs. repeat)-as key contingencies affecting the predictive validity of behavioral intention, perceived behavioral control, and behavioral expectation in predicting behavior. These three temporal contingencies are examined in two longitudinal field studies: (1) study 1-a 6-month study of personal computer (PC) purchase behavior among 861 households and (2) study 2-a 12-month study among 321 employees in the context of a new technology implementation in an organization. In study 1, where the episodic behavior of PC purchase was examined, we found that increasing anticipation (i.e., more distal) weakened the relationship between behavioral intention and behavior and strengthened the relationship between behavioral expectation and behavior. In contrast, increasing experience strengthened the relationship between behavioral intention and behavior and weakened the relationship between behavioral expectation and behavior. In study 2, where the repeat behavior of technology use was examined, we found two significant 3-way interactions: (1) the relationship between behavioral intention and behavior was strongest when anticipation was low (i.e., proximal) and experience was high and (2) the relationship between behavioral expectation and behavior was strongest when anticipation was high (i.e., distal) and experience was low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-176
Number of pages17
JournalOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

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Microcomputers
Prediction
Technology
Longitudinal Studies
Organizations
Behavioral intention
Anticipation
Contingency
Personal computer
Predictive validity
Purchase behavior
Employees
Purchase
Technology implementation
Field study
Technology use
Perceived behavioral control
Interaction
Household

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Strategy and Management
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Role of time in self-prediction of behavior. / Venkatesh, Viswanath; Maruping, Likoebe M.; Brown, Susan A.

In: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Vol. 100, No. 2, 07.2006, p. 160-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Venkatesh, Viswanath ; Maruping, Likoebe M. ; Brown, Susan A. / Role of time in self-prediction of behavior. In: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. 2006 ; Vol. 100, No. 2. pp. 160-176.
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