Routing around organizations

Self-directed political consumption

Jennifer Suzanne Earl, Lauren Copeland, Bruce Bimber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research on activism in the context of digital media has argued that organizing can happen outside of organizations and even without SMOs. This work has been focused primarily on the "supply side" of participation. In this article, we expand this line of work by focusing on the "demand side." We examine the distinction between self-directed and organizationally directed activism from the perspective of the individual, finding that shifts toward movement societies, the rise of lifestyle politics, and, to a lesser extent, changing citizenship norms explain citizen preferences for self-directed versus organizationally directed political consumption. We also analyze the relationship between political interest, different kinds of digital media use, and preferences for self-directed activism. We use original data from a survey in the U.S. on political consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-153
Number of pages23
JournalMobilization
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Digital storage
digital media
political interest
citizenship
supply
citizen
participation
politics
demand
society

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transportation

Cite this

Routing around organizations : Self-directed political consumption. / Earl, Jennifer Suzanne; Copeland, Lauren; Bimber, Bruce.

In: Mobilization, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.06.2017, p. 131-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Earl, Jennifer Suzanne ; Copeland, Lauren ; Bimber, Bruce. / Routing around organizations : Self-directed political consumption. In: Mobilization. 2017 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 131-153.
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