Rupture of the interventricular septum complicating acute myocardial infarction: A multicenter analysis of clinical findings and outcome

A. Christian Held, Patricia L. Cole, Barbara Lipton, Joel M. Gore, Elliott M. Antman, Judith S. Hochman, Jeanne Corrao, Robert J. Goldberg, Joseph S Alpert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute ventricular septal rupture in the setting of acute myocardial infarction continues to present clinicians with a difficult therapeutic dilemma. The role of surgical intervention and its timing remains unresolved. A collaborative study from three institutions was undertaken to examine various clinical outcomes in 46 patients with ventricular septal rupture. No medically treated patient survived hospitalization. Since only surgically treated patients survived, we focused our evaluation on those characteristics that might differentiate surgical survivors from surgical nonsurvivors. Systolic blood pressure, pulse, mean right atrial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, and cardiopulmonary bypass time were univariate predictors of hospital survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that systolic blood pressure, right atrial pressure, and cardiopulmonary bypass time were strongly predictive of survival (p < 0.05). In addition, taken together systolic blood pressure and right atrial pressure identified a group of persons who were much more likely to survive surgical intervention. The results of this study may prove useful in predicting the risk of surgical repair in patients with ventricular septal rupture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1330-1336
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume116
Issue number5 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rupture
Myocardial Infarction
Blood Pressure
Ventricular Septal Rupture
Atrial Pressure
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Survival
Ventricular Pressure
Survivors
Hospitalization
Multivariate Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Rupture of the interventricular septum complicating acute myocardial infarction : A multicenter analysis of clinical findings and outcome. / Held, A. Christian; Cole, Patricia L.; Lipton, Barbara; Gore, Joel M.; Antman, Elliott M.; Hochman, Judith S.; Corrao, Jeanne; Goldberg, Robert J.; Alpert, Joseph S.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 116, No. 5 PART 1, 1988, p. 1330-1336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Held, A. Christian ; Cole, Patricia L. ; Lipton, Barbara ; Gore, Joel M. ; Antman, Elliott M. ; Hochman, Judith S. ; Corrao, Jeanne ; Goldberg, Robert J. ; Alpert, Joseph S. / Rupture of the interventricular septum complicating acute myocardial infarction : A multicenter analysis of clinical findings and outcome. In: American Heart Journal. 1988 ; Vol. 116, No. 5 PART 1. pp. 1330-1336.
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