Safeguarding species, languages, and cultures in the time of diversity loss

From the Colorado Plateau to global hotspots

Gary P Nabhan, Patrick Pynes, Tony Joe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hotspots of biodiversity have become priority areas for land conservation initiatives, oftentimes without recognition that these areas are hotspots of cultural diversity as well. Using the Colorado Plateau ecoregion as a case study, this inquiry (1) outlines the broad geographic patterns of biological diversity and ethnolinguistic diversity within this ecoregion; (2) discusses why these two kinds of diversity are often influenced by the same geographic and historic factors; and (3) suggests what can be done to integrate traditional ecological knowledge of indigenous peoples into multicultural conservation collaborations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-175
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Volume89
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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ecoregion
ecoregions
plateaus
plateau
biodiversity
multicultural diversity
indigenous peoples
land management
case studies
loss
land conservation

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation planning
  • Linguistic diversity
  • Traditional ecological knowledge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Safeguarding species, languages, and cultures in the time of diversity loss : From the Colorado Plateau to global hotspots. / Nabhan, Gary P; Pynes, Patrick; Joe, Tony.

In: Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden, Vol. 89, No. 2, 2002, p. 164-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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