SAGEEP3 multi-scale monitoring of ecohydrological processes using electrical resistivity tomography

R. L. Van Dam, D. Hyndman, A. Kendall, K. Diker, B. Christoffersen, Scott Saleska

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Hydrogeophysics is a growing discipline that holds significant promise to help elucidate details of dynamic processes in the near surface, built on the ability of geophysical methods to measure properties from which hydrological and geochemical variables can be derived. For example, bulk electrical conductivity is governed by, amongst others, interstitial water content, fluid salinity, and temperature, and can be measured using a range of geophysical methods. In many cases, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is well suited to characterize these properties in multiple dimensions and to monitor dynamic processes, such as water infiltration and solute transport. In recent years, ERT has been used increasingly for ecosystem research in a wide range of settings; in particular to characterize vegetation-driven changes in root-zone and near-surface water dynamics. This increased popularity is due to operational factors (e.g., improved equipment, low site impact), data considerations (e.g., excellent repeatability), and the fact that ERT operates at scales significantly larger than traditional point sensors. Current limitations to a more widespread use of the approach include the high equipment costs, and the need for site-specific petrophysical relationships between properties of interest. In this presentation we will discuss recent equipment advances and theoretical and methodological aspects involved in the accurate estimation of soil moisture from ERT results. Examples will be presented from two studies in a temperate climate (Michigan, USA) and one from a humid tropical location (Tapajos, Brazil).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNear Surface 2011 - 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics
PublisherEuropean Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE
StatePublished - 2011
Event17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, Near Surface 2011 - Leicester, United Kingdom
Duration: Sep 12 2011Sep 14 2011

Other

Other17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, Near Surface 2011
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLeicester
Period9/12/119/14/11

Fingerprint

tomography
electrical resistivity
geophysical method
monitoring
solute transport
soil moisture
electrical conductivity
rhizosphere
ecosystems
Brazil
infiltration
porewater
salinity
vegetation
surface water
water content
moisture content
climate
sensor
solutes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics

Cite this

Van Dam, R. L., Hyndman, D., Kendall, A., Diker, K., Christoffersen, B., & Saleska, S. (2011). SAGEEP3 multi-scale monitoring of ecohydrological processes using electrical resistivity tomography. In Near Surface 2011 - 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE.

SAGEEP3 multi-scale monitoring of ecohydrological processes using electrical resistivity tomography. / Van Dam, R. L.; Hyndman, D.; Kendall, A.; Diker, K.; Christoffersen, B.; Saleska, Scott.

Near Surface 2011 - 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics. European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE, 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Van Dam, RL, Hyndman, D, Kendall, A, Diker, K, Christoffersen, B & Saleska, S 2011, SAGEEP3 multi-scale monitoring of ecohydrological processes using electrical resistivity tomography. in Near Surface 2011 - 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics. European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE, 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics, Near Surface 2011, Leicester, United Kingdom, 9/12/11.
Van Dam RL, Hyndman D, Kendall A, Diker K, Christoffersen B, Saleska S. SAGEEP3 multi-scale monitoring of ecohydrological processes using electrical resistivity tomography. In Near Surface 2011 - 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics. European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE. 2011
Van Dam, R. L. ; Hyndman, D. ; Kendall, A. ; Diker, K. ; Christoffersen, B. ; Saleska, Scott. / SAGEEP3 multi-scale monitoring of ecohydrological processes using electrical resistivity tomography. Near Surface 2011 - 17th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics. European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE, 2011.
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