SATELLITE MASSES IN THE URANUS AND NEPTUNE SYSTEMS.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The present knowledge of satellite masses, and how they are derived, is reviewed with emphasis on implications for bulk densities and albedos. In general for the Uranian system, the inner satellites have lower densities and/or higher albedos than the outer ones. However, uncertainties are great enough that all five satellites may have nearly equal densities. In that case, albedo would generally (but not monotonically) decrease with semi-major axis. A more severe constraint than previously published is here placed on Miranda's mass, and hence on its density and albedo. The recent radiometric value for Triton's diameter, combined with now-rather-old mass determinations, yields a density greater than 4 gm/cm**3, but systematic errors are possible in both mass and diameter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNASA Conference Publication
EditorsJay T. Bergstralh
PublisherNASA, Scientific & Technical Information Branch
Pages463-480
Number of pages18
StatePublished - 1984

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Satellites
Systematic errors
Uncertainty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering

Cite this

Greenberg, R. J. (1984). SATELLITE MASSES IN THE URANUS AND NEPTUNE SYSTEMS. In J. T. Bergstralh (Ed.), NASA Conference Publication (pp. 463-480). NASA, Scientific & Technical Information Branch.

SATELLITE MASSES IN THE URANUS AND NEPTUNE SYSTEMS. / Greenberg, Richard J.

NASA Conference Publication. ed. / Jay T. Bergstralh. NASA, Scientific & Technical Information Branch, 1984. p. 463-480.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Greenberg, RJ 1984, SATELLITE MASSES IN THE URANUS AND NEPTUNE SYSTEMS. in JT Bergstralh (ed.), NASA Conference Publication. NASA, Scientific & Technical Information Branch, pp. 463-480.
Greenberg RJ. SATELLITE MASSES IN THE URANUS AND NEPTUNE SYSTEMS. In Bergstralh JT, editor, NASA Conference Publication. NASA, Scientific & Technical Information Branch. 1984. p. 463-480
Greenberg, Richard J. / SATELLITE MASSES IN THE URANUS AND NEPTUNE SYSTEMS. NASA Conference Publication. editor / Jay T. Bergstralh. NASA, Scientific & Technical Information Branch, 1984. pp. 463-480
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