Saving the Children for the Tobacco Industry

Mark Nichter, Elizabeth Cartwright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article we juxtapose the recent success of child survival programs with the growing health problems and environmental destruction related to tobacco consumption and cultivation as a form of defective modernization. Data on tobacco cultivation and its impact on ecology, global smoking trends, the economics of the tobacco industry, cigarette marketing, and projected levels of morbidity are all reviewed. We focus on the effects of smoking not just on the consumer but also on the household. The complicity of the U.S. government in promoting cigarette sales in the Third World is considered in relation to ethical issues pertaining to the concepts of market justice and free trade. 1991 American Anthropological Association

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-256
Number of pages21
JournalMedical Anthropology Quarterly
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Tobacco Industry
Tobacco Products
nicotine
smoking
Complicity
Smoking
tobacco consumption
Anthropology
Environmental Health
industry
Social Justice
Tobacco Use
free trade
Marketing
Ecology
Social Change
Ethics
Third World
morbidity
Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Saving the Children for the Tobacco Industry. / Nichter, Mark; Cartwright, Elizabeth.

In: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1991, p. 236-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nichter, Mark ; Cartwright, Elizabeth. / Saving the Children for the Tobacco Industry. In: Medical Anthropology Quarterly. 1991 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 236-256.
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