Scaling health and healthcare: Re-presenting Thailand's HIV/AIDS epidemic with world regional geography students

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Authors of world regional geography textbooks have recently become more interested in the broader theoretical changes that have emerged in human geography. Relying on feminist and other critical perspectives, concepts such as space, place and scale are being re-imagined in this 'new world regional geography'. This paper intervenes on behalf of a more critical world regional geography by suggesting how world regional geography teachers can educate students about scale as a social construction through the use of empirical data. Relying on fieldwork conducted in Thailand, this paper lays out a lesson on the HIV/AIDS crisis and how different representations of that crisis, from the national to the individual, offer different 'ways of knowing' the epidemic. Furthermore, this paper examines how we can push students to consider the ways in which scales of analysis are constructed and constituted through our own geographic practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-346
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Geography in Higher Education
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

regional geography
acquired immune deficiency syndrome
human immunodeficiency virus
scaling
health care
Thailand
AIDS
student
geography
health
social construction
human geography
textbook
fieldwork
world
teacher

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Scale
  • Thailand
  • World regional geography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

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