Scanning electron microscopy of renal vascular casts

S. R. Bielke, Raymond B Nagle, B. F. Trump, R. E. Bulger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of Cementex to form casts of the renal vascular system is described. These casts are useful in delineating the vascular microarchitecture of the kidney including that of the glomerular capillaries, but do not appear to reproducibly reflect physiologic vascular tone. The postglomerular vascular system is often incompletely filled using this technique. The amount of filling can be altered by the techniques used in cast preparation. The effect of perfusion pressure, concentration of Cementex, fixation, and type of color additive are compared with respect to the cast structure. It is concluded that the various problems inherent in the perfusion of an in vivo kidney can lead to ambiguous results. Cementex has some undesirable properties: high viscosity, foaminess and uneven polymerization which make it less than ideal for injection studies of live animals. In addition, the compound may evoke a vascular response and changes in vessel tone may accompany the delay in hardening of the casts. Because of these unknown and uncontrolled factors, the technique was not found to be sensitive enough to reflect physiologic redistribution of blood. Vasodilation as seen after norepinephrine administration was unexplained. Either norepinephrine causes vasodilation of renal arterioles or the casts do not reliably reflect in vivo vasoconstriction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-96
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Microscopy
Volume108
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Norepinephrine
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Blood Vessels
casts
Kidney
Scanning electron microscopy
scanning electron microscopy
vasodilation
norepinephrine
cardiovascular system
Hardening
Animals
Blood
Vasodilation
Polymerization
kidneys
Viscosity
Color
Perfusion
vasoconstriction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Bielke, S. R., Nagle, R. B., Trump, B. F., & Bulger, R. E. (1976). Scanning electron microscopy of renal vascular casts. Journal of Microscopy, 108(1), 89-96.

Scanning electron microscopy of renal vascular casts. / Bielke, S. R.; Nagle, Raymond B; Trump, B. F.; Bulger, R. E.

In: Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 108, No. 1, 1976, p. 89-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bielke, SR, Nagle, RB, Trump, BF & Bulger, RE 1976, 'Scanning electron microscopy of renal vascular casts', Journal of Microscopy, vol. 108, no. 1, pp. 89-96.
Bielke, S. R. ; Nagle, Raymond B ; Trump, B. F. ; Bulger, R. E. / Scanning electron microscopy of renal vascular casts. In: Journal of Microscopy. 1976 ; Vol. 108, No. 1. pp. 89-96.
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