SCINTILLATION AT TWO OPTICAL FREQUENCIES.

William B. Hubbard, H. J. Reitsema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stellar scintillation data were obtained on a single night at a variety of zenith distances and azimuths, using a photon-counting photometer recording at 100 Hz simultaneously at wavelengths of 0. 475 mu m and 0. 870 mu m. Orientable apertures of 42-cm diam separated by 1 m were used to establish the average upper atmosphere wind direction and velocity. Dispersion in the earth's atmosphere separates the average optical paths at the two wavelengths, enabling a reconstruction of the spatial cross-correlation function for scintillations to be made, independent of assumptions about differential fluid motions. Although there is evidence of a complicated velocity field, scintillation power was predominantly produced by levels at pressures of 130 plus or minus 30 mbar. The data are not grossly inconsistent with layers of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence, but there is some evidence for deviation from the Kolmogorov spectral index and/or anisotropy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3227-3232
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Optics
Volume20
Issue number18
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

Fingerprint

Scintillation
scintillation
Photometers
Wavelength
wind direction
Upper atmosphere
Earth atmosphere
wind velocity
upper atmosphere
zenith
optical paths
azimuth
wavelengths
night
cross correlation
photometers
counting
Anisotropy
Turbulence
Photons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Hubbard, W. B., & Reitsema, H. J. (1981). SCINTILLATION AT TWO OPTICAL FREQUENCIES. Applied Optics, 20(18), 3227-3232.

SCINTILLATION AT TWO OPTICAL FREQUENCIES. / Hubbard, William B.; Reitsema, H. J.

In: Applied Optics, Vol. 20, No. 18, 01.01.1981, p. 3227-3232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hubbard, WB & Reitsema, HJ 1981, 'SCINTILLATION AT TWO OPTICAL FREQUENCIES.', Applied Optics, vol. 20, no. 18, pp. 3227-3232.
Hubbard WB, Reitsema HJ. SCINTILLATION AT TWO OPTICAL FREQUENCIES. Applied Optics. 1981 Jan 1;20(18):3227-3232.
Hubbard, William B. ; Reitsema, H. J. / SCINTILLATION AT TWO OPTICAL FREQUENCIES. In: Applied Optics. 1981 ; Vol. 20, No. 18. pp. 3227-3232.
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