Seasonal Variation of Water Quality in Unregulated Domestic Wells

Yoshira Ornelas Van Horne, Jennifer Parks, Thien Tran, Leif M Abrell, Kelly A Reynolds, Paloma Beamer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the United States (U.S.), up to 14% of the population depend on private wells as their primary drinking water source. The U.S. government does not regulate contaminants in private wells. The goals of this study were to investigate the quality of drinking water from unregulated private wells within one mile (1.6 kilometers) of an effluent-dominated river in the arid Southwest, determine differences in contaminant levels between wet and dry seasons, and identify contributions from human sources by specifically measuring man-made organic contaminants (perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfate (PFOS), and sucralose). Samples were collected during two dry seasons and two wet seasons over the course of two years and analyzed for microbial (Escherichia coli), inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nitrate), and synthetic organic (PFOA, PFOS, and sucralose) contaminants. Arsenic, nitrate, and Escherichia coli concentrations exceeded their respective regulatory levels of 0.01 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 1 colony forming unit (CFU)/100 mL, respectively. The measured concentrations of PFOA and PFOS exceeded the respective Public Health Advisory level. Arsenic, PFOA, PFOS, and sucralose were significantly higher during the dry seasons, whereas E. coli was higher during the wet seasons. While some contaminants were correlated (e.g., As and Hg ρ = 0.87; PFOA and PFOS ρ = 0.45), the lack of correlation between different contaminant types indicates that they may arise from different sources. Multi-faceted interventions are needed to reduce exposure to drinking water above health-based guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 5 2019

Fingerprint

perfluorooctanoic acid
trichlorosucrose
Water Quality
Sulfates
Drinking Water
Arsenic
Escherichia coli
State Government
Chromium
Cadmium
Rivers
Nitrates
Copper
Stem Cells
Public Health
perfluorooctane
Guidelines

Keywords

  • arsenic
  • Escherichia coli
  • PFOA
  • PFOS
  • private well water
  • sucralose
  • water quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Seasonal Variation of Water Quality in Unregulated Domestic Wells. / Ornelas Van Horne, Yoshira; Parks, Jennifer; Tran, Thien; Abrell, Leif M; Reynolds, Kelly A; Beamer, Paloma.

In: International journal of environmental research and public health, Vol. 16, No. 9, 05.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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